YALSA Professional Learning Series: The Future of Library Services for and with Teens –Working with At-Risk Teens

gameboard

In last week’s post  on working with teens who may be at risk we started to discuss what barriers people may face in working with teens who may be at risk as well as some examples of work people are doing in their libraries.

This week in discussion related to working with teens who may be at risk, let’s talk about successes that people have had with working with teens who may be at risk. Thinking about what you’ve read related to this topic, and what you’ve been able to accomplish, let us know:

  • A success you’ve had in your library implementing YALSA Futures Report related ideas that helped make change in your work with and for teens who may be at risk
  • What you think helped to make that success possible
  • Ideas and suggestions you have for others who are also working with teens who may be at risk
  • Questions you have about implementing some of the ideas in your work with and for teens who may be at risk

Here is the first post in this series if you would like to be part of the discussion and share some of your thoughts. Please share your thoughts and questions in the comments section and feel free to comment/question on anyone else’s. Feel free to reach out directly to me if you have any questions about any of the posts jsnow@bpl.org

 

Rethinking YALSA: What’s New in YALSA and How You Can Be a Part of It!

The YALSA Board has been hard at work throughout this year and last year looking at YALSA’s Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action report, association capacity and sustainability, and incorporating member and stakeholder feedback to re-envision the organization’s Strategic Plan to create an association that is more nimble, more modern and more reflective of the needs of teens and our members both today and into the future.

The result is YALSA’s new Organizational Plan!

Please check it out: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa/strategicplan

You can also find YALSA’s new Mission, Vision, and Impact Statements (http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa/mission%26vision/yalsamission) and the Implementation Plan (http://www.ala.org/yalsa/sites/ala.org.yalsa/files/content/ImplementationPlan.pdf)

Mission: Our mission is to support library staff in alleviating the challenges teens face, and in putting all teens ‒ especially those with the greatest needs ‒ on the path to successful and fulfilling lives.

Vision: Our vision is that all teens have access to quality library programs and services ‒ no matter where they occur ‒ that link them to resources, connected learning opportunities, coaching, and mentoring that are tailored to the unique circumstances of the community and that create new opportunities for all teens’ personal growth, academic success, and career development

Intended Impact Statement: To meaningfully address the challenges teens face today and to put more teens on the path to a successful and fulfilling life, YALSA will support library staff who work for and with teens in the transformation of teen library services so that:

  • Libraries reach out to and serve ALL teens in the community no matter what their backgrounds, interests, needs, or abilities, and whether or not they frequent the library space.
  • The library “space” is at once both physical and virtual. It connects teens to other people, printed materials, technology, and digital content, not limiting teens to a designated teen area but rather inviting them into the full scope of the library’s assets and offerings.
  • Teens co-create, co-evaluate, and co-evolve library programs and activities with library staff and skilled volunteers (including mentors and coaches) based on their passions and interests. These programs and activities are connected to teens’ personal, work, or academic interests across multiple literacies; generate measurable outcomes for teens’ skills and knowledge; and are tailored to the unique circumstances of the community.

To achieve this impact, the YALSA Board identified the following priority areas:

  • Leading the transformation of teen library services (including a cultural competency component)
  • Advocacy to policy makers at all levels to increase support for teen library services
  • Funder and partner development

We’re really excited about the new plan and our #TeensFirst focus and we want to know what your thoughts and/or questions are!

To that end, we’ve put together an Organizational Plan FAQ: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/organizational-plan-faq-2016-2018

YALSA President-Elect Sarah Hill and I are also hosting a virtual video townhall on Monday, June 13th, from 2-3 p.m. Eastern via Zoom.

And, if you’re attending ALA Annual in Orlando next month, we will also be hosting a face to face session on YALSA’s new Organizational Plan on Saturday, June 25th, from 8:30-10 a.m. at the Rosen Centre, Room Salon 03/04, called What’s New in YALSA and How You Can Be a Part of It!

If you have any other questions, comments, concerns and/or compliments, feel free to email me at candice. YALSA [at] gmail.com or reach me via Twitter @tinylibrarian! Hope to see you online and/or in person at our Townhall and at ALA Annual!

YALSA’s Top Ten Summer Learning Programs

Last month, YALSA held a “Top Ten Summer Learning Programs” contest on its teen programming database, Teen Programming HQ. Thanks to the HQ’s member manager and content experts for reviewing the submissions, we have the winners of the contest.

The top ten are:

Congrats to all the winners and thanks to everyone who participated in the contest! Don’t forget to visit the Teen Programming HQ to share and find great teen programming ideas!

Secrets of the Orange County Convention Center and Surrounding Area

Conferences can be difficult to navigate.  Between arriving on time, knowing where to park, and finding a cup of coffee, one can easily miss that important session.  Don’t get lost trying to prepare for the day!  Here are a few tips to make your conference go smoother.

cup-of-coffee13There is a reason why all of the hotels around the convention center have coffee shops…the coffee offered in the convention center by the vendors, shall we say, leaves much to be desired.

Pro Tip:  Most hotels have K-cup coffee makers in room.  Bring your own K-cups and your own travel mug to make your morning coffee.

Desperate Measures:  Nearest Starbucks:  10725 International Drive #110

711-lunch-break-isolated-icon-on-light-brownLunch can be the most costly meal of the day if you are not careful.  Meals in the Convention Center Cafeteria are usually $20.00.  The vendors in the exhibit hall have a slightly lower price for a lunch plate, but remember it is fast food.

Pro Tip:  Purchase a ticket for one of the many author or other value added luncheons offered.  You will have a great meal and an experience.

Desperate Measures:  Option 1:  Remember, some of the vendors will be inviting you to a “lunch and learn”.  You will receive a free meal while you listen to their pitch.  Option2: Pack your own lunch. (Granola bar, trail mix, piece of fruit from breakfast.)  Option 3:  Optimize the snack breaks offered in the hall between sessions.

gasInternational Drive has numerous restaurants and attractions, but you won’t find a gas station.  Many folks find themselves on Sand Lake Road paying “tourist inflated” prices.  Don’t buy gasoline there.

Pro Tip:  Go to 7-Eleven @ 6026 Destination Parkway.  Grab a Big Gulp and a Lotto ticket while you fill up.

Desperate Measures:  Well, you did bring comfortable shoes, right?

parkingThe OCCC charges $15 per day for standard vehicles and $25 per day for oversized vehicles.

Pro Tip:  Arrive early as parking fills fast or leave car in hotel parking and take the ALA shuttle.

Desperate Measures:  If you are healthy, most hotels are within one mile of the convention center.  Watch for traffic and use the crosswalks.

drug-store-icon-vector-illustration-53855958Sunburned. Forgot your prescription.

Pro Tip:  Nearest drugstore: Walgreens @ 9858 International Drive

Desperate Measures:  Remember most hotels have a basic needs bodega or closet to assist their quests.  It never hurts to ask.

Vandy Pacetti-Donelson is a Library Media Specialist. She is a Florida Native, library advocate and Board Director for the Florida Association for Media in Education (FAME). Find her online at www.eliterateandlevelingup.com or follow her on Twitter @VandyPD.

 

YALSA’s Mentoring Program: Make a Difference in a Library Staff Member’s Life

hand writing on a chalkboard with the word mentorI bet that many YALSAblog readers have been fortunate enough to have a professional mentor. Maybe that experience was serendipitous and the mentoring relationship wasn’t planned but nonetheless ended up being an important part of professional growth. I’ve been fortunate enough in my career to be mentored both spontaneously and through specific planning. Each has been a fantastic experience and I am grateful to the mentors I’ve had in my professional life.

I’ve also been a mentor and was fortunate enough to act as a mentor as a part of YALSA’s formal virtual mentoring program. That too was a great experience. Not only did I get to help a newish library staff member move forward in their work, I also learned a lot from the people I worked with. Learning about their work, their questions, and the projects they wanted to pursue helped me to think more about what are the best ways to serve teens with and through libraries.

Now you have the chance to make a difference in a library staff member’s life and also perhaps gain some new insights yourself. YALSA’s virtual mentoring program is accepting applications for both mentors and proteges through June 1. It’s a perfect opportunity. And, if you know someone who you think would be a great mentor please pass this information on to them.

Personal Service Priority Plan, Part 5

Every once in awhile the stars align and outreach opportunities present themselves with little effort on your part! But how does one create an intentional plan in a short amount of time when something like this comes up? This month I use my Personal Service Priority Plan to determine what types of outreach to pursue with the many Homeschooling families in my community.

By this point it’s (hopefully) clear that seeking to reach all youth in the community, regardless of how often they come into the physical library branch, is a priority for library staff. YALSA’s new Intended Impact Statement charges libraries to serve ALL teens in the community, and the YALSA Futures report encourages new ways of thinking about Outreach activities. What might Outreach look like if the group you want to reach doesn’t fit into neat definitions or similar socioeconomic situations? Continue reading

Chris Crutcher Inspired Me to be An Intellectual Freedom Activist for Teens

I had only been a school librarian for a few years when a school in a neighboring county had a high profile materials challenge involving Chris Crutcher’s Whale Talk. Area libraries and Crutcher responded by planning some related events coinciding with the 2005 Banned Books Week, and his stops included our local public library. When one of my teachers saw the promotional poster I’d created for Crutcher’s speech, she echoed my belief that limiting access to anything sets a dangerous precedent. We were both eager to capitalize on the opportunity for her students to hear the renowned author and re-imagined her twelfth grade research paper as case studies in censorship.

Chris Crutcher (2005)

The project was successful beyond our wildest expectations in engaging students intellectually and promoting conversation about fundamental rights. Though the event with Crutcher was remote from campus and held in the evening, the majority of the class attended the lecture. He was gracious enough to pose with our students afterwards (above). Crutcher’s talk that night made me understand the needs of young people to see their experiences reflected in literature. As he spoke about his background as a family therapist and the many ways in which his books reflect the lived experience of young people and offer support for those who needed it, it galvanized my belief in intellectual freedom as a fundamental aspect of youth services.
Continue reading

Instagram of the Week — May 23

A brief look at ‘grams of interest to engage teens and librarians navigating this social media platform.

While we may remember card catalogs and index cards, what about microfiche records of library cards? How about punch cards and the ever evolving bookmobile? It’s easy to forget how transformative technology has been to our work. When the days are long and the to-do lists are never ending, check out the Instagram hashtags #vintagelibrary and #librarytbt (library throwback Thursday) for a good dose of “back in the day was so much harder.” You might also find some ideas worth bringing back. Library billboards, anyone?

Despite the rapid changes of the past few decades, what hasn’t changed is the library’s solid foundation as an institution of choice. As the Future of Library Services for and with Teens explains, we have the choice to discontinue roles that are no longer a priority for students or the community. Youth not only have the choice to read what they want, but can participate in what they want at the library in-person or online. It’s definitely exciting!

Continue reading

Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten Free, No Problem in Orlando

Orlando is a large city with many food options, but sometimes when we have special dietary requirements, finding good places to eat can be frustrating.  There is no shortage of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free choices here in Orlando.

Top Vegetarian Choices

Veggie Garden 1216 E Colonial Dr Ste 11, Orlando, Florida 32803 407-228-1740 Now Open: Mon-Thu 9:00am-8:00pm, Sat 9:00am-9:00pm, Sun 9:00am-8:00pm Cuisine: Vegan-friendly, Take-out, Asian, Vietnamese Serves Vietnamese vegan and vegetarian cuisine. Menu features a signature soup broth which uses over eight kinds of fresh vegetables and fruit. Small and cozy, sit down for a quick bite or take food to-go. Accepts credit cards. Inexpensive.

Dandelion Communitea Café 618 N Thornton Ave (at downtown), Orlando, Florida 32803 407-362-1864 Mon-Sat 11:00am-10:00pm, Sun 11:00am-5:00pm Cuisine: Vegan-friendly Orlando vegetarian cafe and urban teas shop. Provides a friendly and relaxing environment. Find Sweet Tooth vegan goodies here. Moderate.

Woodlands Pure Veg 6040 S Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, Florida 32809 407-854-3330 Call for hours – tell us Cuisine: Vegan-friendly, Lacto, Indian, Buffet, Catering Vegetarian Indian restaurant features south Indian cuisine. Has a varied. daily lunch buffet. Food can be spicy. Simple decor. Open Tue-Sun lunch and dinner, closed Mon. Moderate.

Vegan Choices

Fresh 24 2816 Corrine Dr, Orlando, Florida 32803 407-897-1355 Mon-Sat 10:00am-6:00pm, Sun 11:00am-4:00pm A produce market selling only local farm fresh produce which arrives at the store within 24 hours of being picked. Daily produce arrivals include hydroponic, organic, and conventional farming.

Rhaphsodic Bakery 710 N Mills Ave, Orlando, Florida 32803 407-704-8615 Mon-Thu 11:00am-7:00pm, Fri-Sat 11:00am-8:00pm Vegan except for jars of honey, this bakery makes all-vegan desserts and baked goods and has a cold case with drinks, cakes, cookies, biscuits. Rotating local artwork displays. Free Wi-Fi. Wheelchair accessible. Accepts credit cards.

Continue reading

Rethinking YALSA: I’m Excited – How About You?

In late April the YALSA Board approved the association’s new organizational plan. If you haven’t read the plan I think you want to. And, if you need some encouragement, check-out what some YALSA Board members are excited about:

photo of Jennifer Korn with teens and a sign that says - excited about the teens first approach


YALSA Board member Jennifer Korn with library teens – they are excited with the Teens First focus.
Continue reading