App of the Week: Splice

Title: Splice
Platform: iPhone running iOS 4
Cost: Free or $1.99 Pro Version

Splice main screenWhen I first bought my iPhone, one of the things I was really looking forward to using was the iMovie app. But, once I got my iPhone I didn’t really use that app that much. It didn’t do what I hoped it would. But now, there’s Splice, an iPhone app that makes it possible to edit and enhance movies, and slideshows, on an iPhone. While the editing and enhancing isn’t always a snap with Splice, it is pretty easy. And, the features included with the software are pretty varied.

The first step in using Splice is to have video and/or photos on your phone that you want to edit together in some way. Or, even if you just have one movie on the phone, you can edit it with Splice, add music, sound effects, narration, titles, transitions, and more. But, let me get back to those first steps.

When you open Splice you add a new project and then set the basic options. Don’t worry, these options can be changed after you set them. Options include the quality of the video – HD or SD – the type of transitions you would like to use, and the border you want to add to the production. You can go without a border and transitions and add them later, or never, it’s up to you.

video editing in SpliceOnce your project is setup you can add photos and/or video. The photos and video come from the camera roll of your phone. Add one image or video at a time or add several all at once. Once the images are added you can edit them. Video can be trimmed and sound effects can be added.

One of the things I liked the best was the possibility of adding music. Music from an iTunes library can be added to a section of the movie or to the entire movie. (Of course you want to make sure you have the rights to include the music.) Or, you can use music that is a part of the basic Splice package. adding sound to Splice videoWhen the music is added you can have it fade in or out or both. It’s also possible to record audio in Splice. If you have photos or video that you want to add narration to, it’s not hard to do.

Transitions and title slides can be added anywhere in the production – not over video or a photo but in between photos and videos.

Splice has a store from which you can add components to the app. You can buy borders, sound effects, transitions, and music. While this is a nice feature, it’s not required.

Reviews of the app note that it can crash periodically, and it does, this isn’t too much of a problem as everything put together is auto-saved. Crashes do happen, but a quick re-opening of the app and it’s easy to start where you last left off.

Splice is really quite a full-featured movie editing app. Teens who use their phones to create movies, or who might simply have a selection of photos which they want to set to music and add titles to, will no doubt find a lot of options for being creative when using Splice. For libraries that do not have computers with editing software, but have access to iPhones, Splice is good option for teen video production. Splice is also a good tool to use after filming a teen event, use the app to edit the video and then post it on the web.

Below is a sample movie I made with the app. It’s far from high-quality moviemaking, but it should give you an idea of how the transitions, titles, and music work.

About Linda W Braun

Linda W Braun is a YALSA Past President, the YALSA CE Consultant, and a learning consultant/project management coordinator at LEO: Librarians & Educators Online.
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