Blog Post Checklist

  • Have you used YALSA Standardized Terms?
  • Does it posses a professional tone and is free of grammar and spelling errors?
  • Have you cited all necessary and relevant resources and further information, including YALSA resources?
  • Does it include photos, if relevant? If yes, have you added photo credits?
  • If no specific project or topic photos are associated with the post, have you included a Creative Commons image that relates to the topic and helps build interest in the post?
  • Did you select appropriate categories and tags for your post? Keep in mind that you don’t need to go overboard with tags and categories, but that you do want to help the YALSAblog organize content through these selections.  Think about what people might search for when looking for content on the topic you write about.
  • Did you use a the More tag for your post?
  • Is your post futures focused? See the checklist below for potential ideas on what this means – note that several of the topics might be covered in your post or you might focus very specifically on one of the topics listed below.:
    • Does your post consider how the content supports teen learning and development?
    • Does it speak to one of the paradigm shifts that are mentioned in the futures report?
      • Teens use of technology?
      • Expanded or media literacies?
      • Connected learning?
      • Social and economic factors impacting teens?
    • Does it discuss bridging the growing knowledge divide?
    • Does it build on teens’ motivations for learning?
    • Does it discuss providing workforce development training?
    • Does it describe being a connector between teens and other community agencies?
    • Does your post cover specific examples of benefits to teens, such as learning, leadership, community, literacy, technology, or creativity?
    • If it is a program is it outcomes focused, does it meet the needs of your community, does it position the library staff as facilitators?
    • Does the post consider outreach opportunities and partnerships?
    • Does it take a whole-library approach?
    • Does it suggest opportunities for professional development or library staff?

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