ALA Emerging Leaders

The ALA Emerging Leaders program is a leadership development program which enables newer library workers from across the country to participate in problem-solving work groups, network with peers, gain an inside look into ALA structure, and have an opportunity to serve the profession in a leadership capacity. It puts participants on the fast track to ALA committee volunteerism as well as other professional library-related organizations.

I was incredibly blessed to have been selected as a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader. I was even more fortunate to have been sponsored by YALSA. My opportunity and experience as an Emerging Leader would not have been possible were it not for YALSA. The learning, networking, and enriching opportunity was one of the best of my life. After my Emerging Leaders experience I ran for ALA Council and I was elected, despite being a new librarian. Being a Councilor-at-Large is a great responsibility as I was elected to not only represent the interests, views, and needs of my fellow librarians and their libraries, but that of their patrons.

Since finishing my Emerging Leaders experience, I continue to work with young adults through selection of YA material, graphic novels, and participating in programs related to tweens and teens. When in doubt, I know that I can rely on the great resources YALSA has available to members and the public.

I am grateful to YALSA and ALA for all the help they have provided to my development, for opportunities afford me through the help of both, and the connections I have made by participating in conferences and programs.

Thank you, YALSA!

Johana Orellana is the Adult Services Librarian at North Richland Hills Library. She is an ALA Councilor-at-Large and a member of the APALA Mentoring Committee.

YALSA Seeks Content Experts for Teen Programming HQ

YALSA is seeking up to four teen programming Content Experts, especially those with expertise in STEAM, school libraries, ESL, outreach, or community partnerships, for its web resource, Teen Programming HQ.

The mission of the site is to provide a one-stop-shop for finding and sharing information about programs of all kinds designed for and with teens. The site promotes best practices in programming by featuring user-submitted programs that align with YALSA’s Teen Programming Guidelines and Futures Report.

The site also enable dissemination of timely information about emerging and new practices for teen programming; raise awareness about appropriate YALSA tools to facilitate innovation in teen programming; and provide a means for members and others interested in teen programs to connect with one another to support and share their efforts to continuously improve their teen programs. In its first year, the HQ ran contests where prizes were given out to “top” programs.

Content Experts will work with the site’s Member Manager to vet all incoming program submissions and determine which meet the necessary criteria for being featured on the site. As part of this effort, Content Experts will be expected to give timely, constructive feedback to individuals regarding their program submissions. Please note that the Content Experts will not be submitting the content; rather, they will be reviewing content that is submitted by others. Content Experts should also feel comfortable with social media and have an understanding that marketing the website will be a crucial part of their role.

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Interested in Being A YALSA Board Fellow?

It is almost that time again! Time to apply to be a YALSA Board Fellow. You can read all about the details of being a Board Fellow here. But what is the experience really like? Check out these posts from previous Board Fellows:

Nicola McDonald first and second post about her experience as Board Fellow.

Carrie Kausch’s post about her experience as Board Fellow.

Applications are due on December 1st. Click here for the application requirements.

Scratch Summit 2016: Combing Hip Hop and Coding in Your Library

Scratch Summit Participants Learning to Use Scratch

Scratch Summit Participants Learning to Use Scratch

This year was the first Scratch Summit, a partnership between the Progressive Arts Alliance (PAA) – a Cleveland based organization that deepens the learning experiences of youth by designing and implementing arts-integrated, project-based learning programs; the Scratch Team; the Scratch Foundation; and researchers from the Coding for All project – including those from the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and the Digital Media and Learning Hub.

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Post-Emergent Library Makerspaces: SLAMS, a Path Forward

At DML 2016 I went to a session on post-emergent library makerspaces. This session really dug into the challenges of maintaining a makerspace in a library overtime, looking past makerspaces and learning labs emergent phase. The session explored libraries that were part of a 1 year action research plan funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Below are challenges and solutions from three different libraries of thosedescribed in the session:

Anythink library created The Studio originally planned and staffed by the teen and the technology librarians but they have now moved on to other position. We don’t have the people to support the spaces. Professional artists had been working in the space but the turnover created communication breakdown between the artists and the library. The loss of the original staff also caused institutional knowledge gaps. It is a small library so there was very little written documentation. In order to keep The Studio going the library realized that all staff needed professional development training, not expert knowledge, just a basic understanding of the materials and the space: what is the tech, how to connect patrons to correct media, how to get in touch with artists-in-residence. To be successful the staff at The Studio recommend that you integrate your program into your institutional structure. Your makerspace can’t just be that shiny room in the corner, it needs to be framed as experiential learning for the patrons. No matter what staff member a patron talks to they should be able to give the gist of the program. They found that they needed to change recruiting and hiring of staff, that they need traditional librarians but also need other professionals with different skill sets. Creative professionals bring their network with them.

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Apply for Our 2017 Summer Learning Resources and Teen Summer Intern Grants

Planning your summer learning program?

Consider applying for our 2017 Summer Learning Resources and Teen Summer Intern Grants.

Through generous funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, two grants are available: the Summer Learning Resources Grant and the Teen Summer Intern Program Grant. The purpose of the grants is to help libraries combat the summer slide, as described in YALSA’s position paper, “Adopting a Summer Learning Approach to Increase Impact.”

Twenty summer learning resources grants, worth $1,000 each, will be awarded to libraries in need and will allow them to provide resources and services to teens who are English language learners, struggling in school and/or who are from socio-economically challenged communities. Twenty teen summer intern program grants, also worth $1,000 each, will be awarded to libraries to support the implementation of summer learning programs while also providing teens a chance to build hands-on job skills.

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Are you ready for National Voter Registration Day?

September 27th is National Voter Registration Day! There are currently 8.9 million 18 and 19-year-olds who will all be first time voters this year. They can register to vote through the Nation Voter Registration Day website which is powered by Rock the Vote. Your teens can also look up their polling information on the Voting Information Project Get to the Polls map, a handy tool created by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Internet Association, and Google.

Make sure your teens know how they register and that their vote matters!

 

 

Apply now for YALSA’s 2017 Summer Learning Resources and Teen Summer Intern Grants

The applications for YALSA’s 2017 Summer Learning Resources and Teen Summer Intern grants is now open.

Through generous funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, two grants are available: the Summer Learning Resources Grant and the Teen Summer Intern Program Grant. The purpose of the grants is to help libraries combat the summer slide, as described in YALSA’s position paper, “Adopting a Summer Learning Approach to Increase Impact.”

Twenty summer learning resources grants, worth $1,000 each, will be awarded to libraries in need and will allow them to provide resources and services to teens who are English language learners, struggling in school and/or who are from socio-economically challenged communities. Twenty teen summer intern program grants, also worth $1,000 each, will be awarded to libraries to support the implementation of summer learning programs while also providing teens a chance to build hands-on job skills.

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YALSA Seeks Member Manager for YALSAblog

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) is seeking a Member Manager for the YALSAblog. The deadline for applications is October 1, 2016. The Member Manager will lead an advisory board that oversees the preparation of content for the blog and solicits content from the YALSA community. The position will be for a one year term starting November 2016 with an option to renew for a second year, based on performance. The Member Manager will receive an honorarium of $500 per year plus $500 towards travel to each Annual Conference and Midwinter Meeting while serving as Member Manager.

The mission of the YALSAblog is to provide a virtual space for publishing timely information about emerging and new practices for library services for and with teens, to explore practices in related fields relevant to teen services, to raise awareness about appropriate YALSA tools to facilitate innovation in teen services, and to provide resources for members and the library community to support their efforts to continuously improve their overall teen services program. The YALSAblog complements the quarterly journal, Young Adult Library Services by providing more time sensitive information.

List of Qualifications:

  1. Strong project management and organizational skills
  2. Excellent verbal and written communications skills, in order to manage content and communicate with existing and potential content providers and developers.
  3. Experience in web publishing with responsibilities including but not limited to: utilizing video clips, audio, and social media, maintaining a high standard of writing, and ensuring compliance with policies created for the maintenance of the site.
  4. Familiarity with WordPress, which YALSA uses for administration of blog sites; knowledge of plugins, tagging, categories and other WordPress tools preferred
  5. PHP knowledge preferred
  6. Dynamic, self-motivated individual
  7. Ability to delegate work and to manage and motivate a variety of contributors and volunteers
  8. Ability to set and meet deadlines
  9. Ability to work well in a team environment
  10. Knowledge of recent developments and trends in library services for and with young adults
  11. Membership in YALSA and a passion for YALSA’s mission
  12. High ethical standards

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YALSA at ALA Midwinter 2017 in Atlanta


CONFERENCE SEEKING PARTICIPANTS

You: A youth services librarian in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area surrounded by young adult patrons who have a lot to say about the books they are reading. Or, maybe you are a youth media specialist who lives a littler further afield but are planning on attending the ALA Midwinter meeting in Atlanta AND you happen to know 5 kids with a lot to say about A Study in Charlotte.

Us: YALSA Local Arrangements committee.


The YALSA Local Arrangements committee for ALA Midwinter in Atlanta, GA is recruiting youth participants for a Best Fiction for Young Adults feedback session. As you know, YALSA takes input from the youth very seriously. Not only does it allow us to shape and support our organizational goals, but also it creates a unique and valuable experience for all participants – those speaking and those listening.

For Atlanta we are interested in hearing 50 local teens tell us what they did or (especially) did not like about the books on the BFYA nomination list. The session will be held on Saturday, January 21, from 1pm – 3pm. But that is not all, these lucky teens and sponsors will also get to tour the exhibition halls that morning and have a lunch party before the session even begins.

All interested parties should submit an application for their groups here: https://ugeorgia.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_e8umnTXWMKd8dH7

Please direct any questions to Micki Waldrop at waldropmicki@gmail.com