YALSA 301 at ALA Annual 2018!

It’s almost time! ALA Annual is upon us and I’m so looking forward to seeing many of you at the awesome lineup of YALSA events.

It’s an exciting time to be a YALSA member! We’re released the New Teen Services Competencies, written a new report supporting librarians working with teens called Transforming Library Services through CE, and we’ve got so much more on the horizon.

This work could not be completed without the dedication of our members. Many of us volunteer our time to take on leadership roles within the organization. And serving in one is a win-win! YALSA benefits from your experiences and work on a common goal, and you gain leadership, team building, and career building skills.

Join us at our YALSA 301 session at ALA Annual to learn more about how you can take the next step in YALSA. YALSA 301 is on Saturday, June 23 at 9 a.m. in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Room 214.  

Can’t make it to conference? I encourage you to contact me and the rest of the Board Development Task Force to learn more. Even if you aren’t ready to run for Board right now, we’d love to share the exciting opportunities that are available!

The Board Development Committee is:

Sarah Hill, Chair, gsarahthelibrarian@gmail.com

Audra Caplan, audra.caplan@gmail.com

Frankin Escobedo, escobedo@ci.oceanside.ca.us

Mary Hastler, hastler@hcplonline.org

Sarah Sogigian, sarah@masslibsystem.org

YALSA Board at #ALAAC18: Revised Chair Manual

At Midwinter 2018, the Board directed the Organization and Bylaws Committee to update and expand the existing Chair Manual. This update would:

• Reflect the Organizational Plan
• Include more big-picture information
• Add outcomes-focused content
• Update the virtual resources content
• Expand the responsibilities, communication, ethics and policies sections

The Organization and Bylaws Committee has made the requested changes, and has submitted board document #19 for review at ALA Annual in New Orleans. We are excited to receive feedback on this document, both from the Board and membership. Additional information can be found in the board document.

If you have any questions regarding the new Chair Manual, please contact Melissa McBride, Chair of Organization & Bylaws: mcbride.melissa@gmail.com

Research on Competency Content Area 9: Outcomes and Assessments

Authored by the YALSA Research Committee

Throughout the current term, the YALSA Research Committee will be looking at Teen Services Competencies for Library Staff through the lens of research.  Through our posts, we will attempt to provide a brief snapshot of how scholarship currently addresses some of the issues put forth through the standards.

Researching outcomes, libraries, and assessments, the research committee narrowed the research results to three relatively recent studies on outcomes and assessments. The first study examines advantages and disadvantages for end of programs assessments (EPA’s) for LIS master programs utilizing a survey. In the second report the research committee will highlight a case study of a LIS distant learning program with an outcome of over 90% graduation rate and what their assessments look like. The third report looks at a review of recent research of school libraries and the importance of using evidence for successful student outcomes.

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If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu – National Library Legislative Day 2018

I became a certified school librarian in 2006.  I spent my early years teaching in school libraries learning the job, honing my craft, attending professional development and reading copious amounts of children’s and young adult literature. The ongoing pursuit of these efforts was to improve my instructional practice, to get better and to grow as a librarian.

I spent countless hours reviewing journal articles about literacy, reading comprehension and instructional strategies. I read online posts from other librarians, reading teachers and classroom teachers. I studied best practices around research and inquiry. I pored over information literacy standards, reading standards and technology standards. I lurked on Twitter and compiled lists of relevant educational and library hashtags. I began posting some of my own educational content. I began teaching professional development coursework and presenting to my peers in-district and at conferences.

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A History of Transforming Library Services for/with Teens through Continuing Education

This post was written by Denise Lyons, the Deputy Director of Statewide Development at South Carolina State Library. She is a co-author of the Transforming Library Services for and with Teens Through Continuing Education (CE) report.

cover of the reportAt the 2016 American Library Association annual conference, two state library agency representatives, from Wisconsin and South Carolina, along with leadership from YALSA, began a conversation about how to build stronger alliances between the groups that serve teens in library organizations. There seemed to be a great deal of overlap with the work of groups at the local, state, and national levels. Yet, there was little collaboration among the different groups.

It seemed reasonable to start considering how to change this by connecting with YALSA. The association already had a relationship with state library agency youth services consultants (“YS Con”). While each state library agency is organized and operates somewhat differently, there is often a person on staff who serves as the youth services (YS) consultant, the one person at the library agency who is the state’s coordinator of children’s and teen services. Many of these positions are part of the Library Development Consulting Department of the state library agency, and most are responsible for providing youth services continuing education opportunities and organizing statewide initiatives such as summer reading and learning programs.
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Pre-ALA Annual Networking Refresher

The ALA Annual Conference is nearly upon us and that means it’s time to brush up on your networking skills. Whether you’re new to networking and conferencing or this is old hat, I hope there’s something here for everyone.

Keep Calm and Network On

Networking does not have to be forced and it’s often best when it’s not. Annual Conference is particularly easy because everyone is there to learn and to meet new people, so you don’t have to think of a clever opening line. “Hi, I’m _________ and I work at __________. Where are you from?” works perfectly. And sure, you might meet some folks who are really only there to learn and not to meet people, and that’s fine. Just keep meeting people and don’t let it get you down.
Business Cards

Though they’re terribly old technology, business cards are still the default for exchanging contact information. Be sure to keep a ballpoint pen (those inky ones smear) to write on the card how/where you met the person and any other info that might jog your memory. And as soon as you can, connect with that person via LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, an email, whatever works for you. As for your own business card, if you want to spend the time and money to come up with something creative, go ahead, but a basic card will do the job. Your time and money is probably better spent perfecting your website, web presence, or blog.
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Future Ready with the Library: The Power of Index Cards

This blog post is adapted from a Future Ready with the Library Community of Practice reflection by Amanda (Mandy) Bundy, Kaibab Paiute Tribal Library; Fredonia, AZ, Mandy is a member of the second cohort of the YALSA Future Ready with the Library project. Future Ready with the Library provides support for small, rural, and tribal library staff to build college and career readiness services for middle school youth. You can read more posts by current and previous project cohort members on this blog.

Mandy’s post is available in three parts
* Part 1 – Introduction
* Part 2 – Weeks 1 to 3
* Part 3 – Weeks 4 to 6
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Explore Libraries at the 2018 ALA Annual Conference: The New Orleans Public Library Main Library and Best Buy Teen Tech Center

The New Orleans Public Library Main Library, located in the Central Business District at 219 Loyola Avenue, is worth a visit during your conference down time. This mid-century modern library opened in 1958 and was designed by Curtis and Davis Architects and Engineers, the same firm that designed the Superdome. The first floor houses the adult collections and computers, and just received a facelift. The second floor houses the library’s youth services division and the brand new Best Buy Teen Tech Center. The third floor holds the city archives and special collections.

The Best Buy Teen Tech Center is funded by Best Buy and the Clubhouse Network, a collaboration with the MIT Media Lab. By design, Best Buy Teen Tech Centers foster interest based-learning using new technology with the support from peer and adult mentors. Here, teens in New Orleans can develop their digital media and maker skills in music production, video production, graphic design, and more. The space will contain Macs and PCs, Adobe Creative Cloud, a music studio, drawing tablets, a 3D printer, green screen capabilities, an HTC VIVE Virtual Reality System, and more.

While there is a formal tour set via a LLAMA ticketed event for Friday, June 22, people with questions or those interested in visiting the Best Buy Teen Tech Center can contact the staff at bbttc@nolalibrary.org

Getting There:

The Main Library is easily accessible from the New Orleans Ernest M. Moral Convention Center with many options to choose from. The 16 and 22 buses offer an air conditioned ride with a fair of $1.25 in exact change each way. The Main Library is also a 1.3 mile walk or a quick Lyft, Uber, or taxi ride. Lastly, some of the ALA shuttles are likely to get you close enough for free with just a short walk.

Adrienne L. Strock is a member of the YALSA Local Arrangements Committee for ALA Annual 2018 and works for the New Orleans Public Library.

Gimme a C (for Collaboration): Collaborate to Stop Summer Slide

As the school year wraps up and Summer Learning approaches, now is a perfect time to collaborate with your local school and public libraries. We all know how important it is for students to maintain literacies, math and other skills during summer vacation. It’s time to reach out and work together to give kids the best summer opportunities, especially those who need the most support.

For schools with summer reading expectations, providing summer reading lists to public libraries can help to ensure that they have listed books on hand for students. School library staff can help to facilitate the connection by reminding teachers to prepare and share lists in spring. Having reading lists early helps public libraries to purchase books before Youth Services Departments get too busy with summer programs.

Public library staff who serve youth can contact their local schools to promote summer learning opportunities. At the elementary level, visiting library classes to encourage students to participate in summer programs can get kids excited about the public library. They should have a flyer or brochure ready to send home with elementary students. Some libraries issue public library cards to students through school, and this can help kids take ownership of their library and strengthen the relationship between school and library.

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Book Buzz at ALA Annual 2018

Join us for Book Buzz before this year’s annual conference!

What: Book Buzz at the New Orleans Public Library

Where: Main Library, 219 Loyola Avenue

When: Thursday, June 21, 8:00 am-4:30 pm

Schedule:

8:00-9:00 Registration/Networking

9:00 – 12:30 Children’s Presentations

12:30 – 1:30 Lunch provided by Publishers

1:30 – 4:30 Adult Presentations

Why?: Find out about new and forthcoming titles for your library, and get advanced reader copies and marketing materials from more than 30 publishers!

The New Orleans Public Library will host Book Buzz as part of this year’s pre-conference festivities. More than 30 publishers will present new and forthcoming titles for you to add to your reader’s advisory toolkits. The morning session will include children’s and young adult presentations, while the afternoon session will focus on adult materials. The publishers will provide lunch.

This event is free and open to librarians. You do not need to be registered for ALA to attend Book Buzz. Because space is limited, registration for Book Buzz is required. Please register through Eventbrite at this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/book-buzz-tickets-45734784973.

For more information about the New Orleans Public Library, visit www.nolalibrary.org.