Suffolk Public Library Young Adult Readers Delighted to Discover New Reads

Before the YALSA Great Books Giveaway books even reached our shelves, young adult readers eagerly snatched up something exciting to read at Suffolk Public Library’s Morgan Memorial Library. Situated in downtown Suffolk, VA, Morgan Memorial Library, one of three Suffolk Public Library locations, sees a lot of foot traffic from local teens and young adults. The Young Adult Collection at MML, though heavily used by these individuals, was dated and rather sparse. Receiving the YALSA Great Books Giveaway Grant allowed us to fill the young adult shelves providing an array of new books for these enthusiastic readers.

With three library locations spread out across 429 square miles of land, Suffolk Public Library sees a diverse group of young adult library visitors. When we came across the YALSA Great Books Giveaway Grant we knew that this was a valuable opportunity to support our efforts with our young adult community not just at our downtown library location but at all three of our library locations and even our bookmobile, known as the Library 2 Go. This grant has been such a positive force in helping to build up our young adult collection and in enhancing the services we provide to our young adult readers.

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Off the Books ALA Annual Event: Library Make’N’Shake

If you’re looking for something hands-on to do that isn’t on the conference schedule, check out the Library Make’N’Shake hosted by Historypin, MIT Media Lab, Digital Public Library of America, and others. Drop into the event at The Howlin Wolf on Saturday, June 23 between 10am-5pm. The event will highlight non-profit partnerships with libraries with activities centered around STEAM, fundraising, community engagement, and more. Lunch will be served mid-day with snoballs from the famous Hansen’s to feast on in the afternoon.

Why should library staff and others working with teens attend? You will have the opportunity to connect with potential partners for both teen and intergenerational projects. Historypin (https://www.historypin.org/en/) will be launching a new product, Storybox, that would be a great, interactive tool to engage and empower future “teen historians” or to gather the community across generations to share their stories and local history. MIT Media Lab (https://www.media.mit.edu/) will host hands-on workshops involving the food computer, storytelling with data, and circuit making with circuit stickers.

If you cannot drop into the hands-on event, stop by for happy hour from 5-7 for small bites, networking opportunities and live music featuring the Stooges Brass Band. The Howlin Wolf is just two blocks from the convention center at 907 S. Peters Street (http://www.thehowlinwolf.com/). For more information visit https://www.librarymakeandshake.org/ or contact Jon Voss at Historypin: jon.voss@historypin.org.

Adrienne L. Strock is a member of the YALSA Local Arrangements Committee for ALA Annual 2018 and works for the New Orleans Public Library.

Future Ready with the Library: When a Snowball is More Than a Snowball

This is adapted from a Future Ready with the Library Community of Practice reflection by Allison Shimek, Fayette Public Library in La Grange, TX. Allison is a member of the second cohort of the YALSA Future Ready with the Library project. Future Ready with the Library provides support for small, rural, and tribal library staff to build college and career readiness services for middle school youth. Read more about Future Ready with the Library and apply for cohort 3.

image of teens reading snowball ideasLike everyone in the Future Ready with the Library cohort, over the past several months I have been busy with meetings and gathering information. Through this work I learned a tremendous amount about my community. So far I met with the middle school principal, middle school librarian, school district assistant superintendent, members of the community theater, parents, a local camp, teens, and the local Rotary Club. It seems that the majority of the community agrees that middle schoolers need social skills that will help them prepare for the workforce. At the same time, those I talk with note that there is little for middle school youth to do in the town during out of school time. Except for band and sports, all after school activities end at 6th grade. There is nowhere for teens to go and hang out or a place that they can feel is just for them. The entire community and the teens recognize this as a huge topic of concern. As a part of the Future Ready with the Library work, I plan to continue to meet with more community groups and businesses in the local area to learn how to and plan for ways to better support teens.
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Get Involved: Join the Financial Advancement Committee

YALSA is currently looking for members to join the Financial Advancement Committee.  What is FAC? This committee is tasked with the important job of working with the Board to implement virtual fundraising campaigns and fundraising efforts at conferences, aimed at both members and nonmembers, to support the $19,595 worth of scholarships and stipends YALSA gives out annually.

Being on FAC is a one year commitment and conference attendance is not required. FAC members work together virtually to plan and promote fundraisers throughout the year, focusing on different scholarships and stipends as we go along. For example, we are currently raising money for a National Library Legislative Day travel stipend, so YALSA can send members to Washington D.C. to advocate for teen services. We also raise money for other grants and awards that don’t have corporate sponsors, such as YALSA’s Spectrum Scholar, an Emerging Leader, a Board Fellow and a Midwinter Paper Presentation.

When FAC isn’t working on fundraising, we spend time contributing content to the YALSA Blog, helping members and non-members understand the long-term value of YALSA’s mission and work and we periodically update and promote YALSA’s Fundraising Toolkit. FAC also makes sure to thank all of the generous donors that give to YALSA.

Don’t have any experience fundraising? Don’t let that stop you! All you need is the ability to work virtually, creativity and a passion for YALSA’s mission! Being on FAC this year has been a very rewarding experience, and I hope you will join me in July for another great year.

If you think you would be a good fit for this exciting committee, please contact YALSA President-Elect Crystle Martin at crystle.martin@gmail.com

Using ASCLA Toolkits for Autism Awareness Month

As the YALSA ALA Liaison, I communicate with many different groups whose member composition varies. One of the many benefits of working with so many diverse groups is being privy to the latest developed resources created by them that are also relevant for a library staff member serving teens. One such excellent resource I want to share with YALSA members comes from the Accessibility Assembly. The Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) heads the ALA Accessibility Assembly, which is comprised of many liaisons from other ALA divisions and round tables as well as ASCLA members.

Several months ago, ASLCA updated their online toolkits that target easy ways in which library staff can make their places and services more accessible to “populations that are underserved such as those with sensory, physical, health or behavioral conditions, those who are incarcerated and more.” There are fifteen toolkits in total and many of the recommendations are applicable to teen library services. As April is nationally recognized as Autism Awareness month, the Autism Spectrum Disorders toolkit might be a good place to start in improving library services to your community’s youth and better meet their needs.

Consider this resource share as an opportunity to improve your status and knowledge in Competency Area 1: Teen Growth and Development and move further through the stages of Developing-Practicing-Transforming.

Amanda Barnhart is a Teen Librarian for the Kansas City Public Library and the current YALSA ALA Liaison.

Countdown to National Library Legislative Day

National Library Legislative Day is one month away. Are you ready for it?

On May 8, library staff and advocates from around the country will descend upon Capitol Hill to speak with our legislators about the impact of libraries on the communities and teens we serve. We are the experts on library services for and with teens and our legislators want to learn from us!

Most of us cannot make it to Washington DC, but do not fret!  You can participate in National Library Legislative Day in a variety of ways. Some members will meet with state and local legislators at state capitols, city halls, county seats, and on our home library turf. Others will engage with legislators through email and social media. You can (and are encouraged to) get teens and other library users involved too.

Successful advocacy happens year-round, but a concerted effort, like that on National Library Legislation Day, amplifies advocate voices. If you’ve never participated in Library advocacy before, National Library Legislation Day is a great time to start. If you are an advocacy-pro, set the example for our less-seasoned advocates. We would also love to hear from you and share your advocacy success stories and tips.

Anyone can participate in National Library Legislative Day, and YALSA has the tools to support you.

Here some quick start steps.

  1. Let ALA know you are participating. Don’t forget that anyone can participate! You do not need to travel to Washington DC.
  2. Check out YALSA’s National Library Legislation Day tools.
  3. Select which way(s) you will engage in advocacy on and around May 8.
  4. Tell your professional and personal networks what you’re up to. Encourage them to join you!
  5. Keep the momentum going! District Days are right around the corner and your local, state, and national legislators want and need to hear from you year-round.

What will I be doing on National Library Legislative Day? I’ll be engaging in advocacy at the most local level. May 8 also happens to be an election day in Ohio and I’m taking the day off of work to campaign at the polls in support of our local public library’s levy issue.

Comment below to let us know how you plan to celebrate and advocate on National Library Legislative Day!

 

Jennifer Korn is the manager of the Pleasant Ridge Branch of The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

Explore Libraries at the 2018 ALA Annual Conference

Many of us love to visit other libraries while we are out of town, and there are plenty to visit in New Orleans that are accessible by streetcar or ferry. Streetcar fare is $1.25 for each ride. If you’re paying on the streetcar, you will need exact change. You can also purchase 1-day, 3-day, and 5-day in advance online (https://ecommerce.norta.com/Store), or download the RTA gomobile app (apple & android) and purchase passes from there. A ferry ride is $2.00 each way. Again, you will need exact change or you can purchase an integrated streetcar, bus, and ferry pass on the mobile app for a higher price.

Take the Algiers Point Ferry to the Cita Dennis Hubbell Library:

Cita Dennis Hubbell Library
725 Pelican Avenue
Hours: MON-THU, 10am-8pm; FRI-SAT: 10am-5pm

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Research on Competency Content Area 7: Cultural Competency and Responsiveness

Authored by the YALSA Research Committee

This post is part of the YALSA Research Committee’s efforts to shed light on some current research related to the Teen Services Competencies for Library Staff. Here, we’ll briefly review some scholarship that addresses competency content area number seven: cultural competency and responsiveness, described in the standards as “actively promot[ing] respect for cultural diversity and creat[ing] an inclusive, welcoming, and respectful library atmosphere that embraces diversity.”

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Research on Competency Content Area 6: Community and Family Engagement

Authored by the YALSA Research Committee

Throughout the current term, the YALSA Research Committee will be looking at YALSA’s new Competencies for Teen Librarians through the lens of research.  Through our posts, we will attempt to provide a brief snapshot of how scholarship currently addresses some of the issues put forth through the standards.

March 14 will never be the same for thousands of young adults who, in response to the high number of recent school shootings, found their voice in the streets of America during the National School Walkout, demanding adults and public officials pay attention to their call for gun control. So my question to our YALSA members “For those that are directly serving our YA population…How were you serving them on March 14 and how did you serve them during the March for Our Lives on March 24?” or “What skills have you helped the young adults in your community develop over time to assist them for this kind of action?”  How are our YALSA members committing to competency #6: “Community and Family Engagement: Builds respectful, reciprocal relationships with community organizations and families to promote optimal development for teens and to enhance the quality of library services”?

The research committee zeroed on three relevant recent studies describing how YA library staff in the field develop or need improvement with developing Community and Family Engagement for and with their teen populations by Harlan (2016), Hughes-Hassell and Stivers (2015), and Froggatt (2015).

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Gimme a C (for Collaboration): The Public Library & School Library Collaboration Toolkit is here!

The AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School/Public Library Cooperation (SPLC) is pleased to announce the publication of the Public Library & School Library Collaboration Toolkit.  This toolkit is the result of a three-year collaborative effort with members of AASL, ALSC and YALSA. It is a collection of information, research, and examples that will help facilitate and incorporate collaborative initiatives between public and school libraries.

The Public Library & School Library Collaboration Toolkit is organized into five chapters, and includes helpful links for additional examples or information.

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