A short list of tweets from the past week of interest to teens and the library staff that work with them.

Do you have a favorite Tweet from the past week? If so add it in the comments for this post. Or, if you read a Twitter post between September 26 – October 2 that you think is a must for the next Tweets of the Week send a direct or @ message to lbraun2000 on Twitter.
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When I went to library school a few decades ago, we learned that in order to provide high-quality library service to youth it was imperative to read library professional literature and attend library related local, regional, state, and national conferences. Today, I’d say, that while it’s possible to provide good library services to teens by focusing one’s personal professional development on the library world, to provide great service to a wide-variety of teens from a wide-variety of demographics it’s imperative to move outside of the library silo. This idea is summed up really well in a recent Twitter exchange.


The conversation took place after @mlhartman attended a TedXEd event (#TEDxBvilleED) and was able to participate in presentations and conversations that included a variety of people involved in the education world. (I highly recommend reading the #TEDxBvilleED stream of Tweets as they are quite educational and inspiring.)
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Title: Hyperlapse
Cost: Free
Platform: iOS 7 or later

A couple of weeks ago Instragram released its new app, Hyperlapse. What does Hyperlapse do? It enables users to shoot time-lapse videos. And, while you might have other apps on your iDevices that already do that, Hyperlapse has the added benefit of a stabalizer so that hand-held time-lapse creations actually look pretty good. Take a look at the video below to get some idea of what I mean.

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Someone asked me recently why it can be hard for libraries to change. She wondered why when her library wanted to try something it required a committee of people and a long process that in many cases meant by the time the something was ready to implement it was too late. I think about this construct a lot and have realized that a part of what is going on is a desire or need to make sure that a program or service is perfect before it launches to the public. When we strive for perfection in libraries we end up creating an environment that isn’t nimble or flexible or responsive to the community. And, as a result, we don’t move forward as quickly as we need.

The conversation where someone asked me about libraries and change led to this Tweet:


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A short list of tweets from the past week of interest to teens and the library staff that work with them.

Do you have a favorite Tweet from the past week? If so add it in the comments for this post. Or, if you read a Twitter post between August 22 and August 28 that you think is a must for the next Tweets of the Week send a direct or @ message to lbraun2000 on Twitter.
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A photo of The Toolbox hardware store by Tim GreenI think a lot about how libraries need find out the best ways to support the needs of specific communities. Often, we do that internally by talking about the teens and families that we know or that we think we know. We do that by going into the schools and talking to classrooms of teens and teachers. But, do we do that by really connecting with the community and finding out what their needs really are? I’m not so sure. Or, maybe I’m not sure we do it enough.

That’s why when I learned about the Community Tool Box I thought, “Wow this is amazing.” And, “This really gives me some good information about how to learn about the community from the community.” My favorite part of the website is the section labeled “Learn a Skill.” For one thing I really like the phrase “Learn a Skill,” It sounds positive and encouraging. But, more than that, the content is incredibly useful.
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listen written on a brick wallFor many, back to school time is a time for learning new things. One thing I’m trying to learn more about and be better at is listening to what people in the community need and want from the library instead of simply going out and telling people what the library has to offer. For example, at a back to school professional development event library staff might be asked to present information on what they have to offer to teachers and students. Typically that might mean going in and saying, “Hi, we have these databases, they are great, use them.” Then we leave and hope that that helped inform teachers about how they can use the library’s resources.

But, really what we should be doing is first asking teachers and staff in schools what they are doing, what do they wish was available in the community, what do they and their students need? We who work with teens in libraries listen to what they tell us and then craft a response that is focused exactly on what we heard when we listened. It’s not focusing on, this is what I think you need, it’s focused on this is what you told me you need and I can directly help that need in this way.
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