YALSA #alamw18 Board Documents #30 & #32

At Annual 2017, the Board directed the O&B Committee to investigate ways to measure outcomes and make the work of the organization more efficient and effective (board document #29). To that end, Organization & Bylaws is bringing Board Document #30 and Board Document #32 up for discussion at ALA Midwinter 2018.

Board document #30 focuses on YALSA’s existing chair manual and it’s need for updating. As chair of the Organization & Bylaws Committee, Melissa McBride is seeking feedback from the Board to guide the Committee’s work on updating the document. O & B would like to update the Chair manual to:

  • Reflect the Organizational Plan
  • Include more big-picture information
  • Add outcomes focused content
  • Update the virtual resources content
  • Update the selection committee content
  • Expand the responsibilities, communication, ethics and policies sections
  • Change the language of the document so it can be used for Chairs, Conveners and Blogging Team Leads
  • Add turn-key materials, like sample messages as well as examples of completed forms and documents that are thorough and well-written

Organization & Bylaws is also seeking feedback from the Board (document #32) on the role of the YALSA Board Liaisons, including seeing how the role can evolve to support YALSA’s more outcomes focused approach. A Board Liaison is a member of the Board who maintains a critical connection between the Board of Directors and a designated committee, jury, advisory board or task force. Board Liaisons are appointed by the President-Elect and assignments begin annually in July. The primary purpose is to facilitate communication between the Board and appointed member groups. The Board Liaison is the Chair’s primary contact for all governance related issues and supports the Chair with leadership of the appointed group as necessary.

Additional information can be found in the board documents. Please email Melissa McBride mcbride.melissa@gmail.com with any questions. Looking forward to seeing you in Denver!

YALSA Board Heads to Denver

Hello, Colleagues-

The YALSA Board of Directors is headed to Denver for ALA’s Midwinter Meeting!

The agenda and related documents for our meetings are posted here.

Please feel free to attend our Board meetings on Saturday from 1:00-5:00 and/or on Sunday from 4:30-5:30. All of our meetings will be held in the Convention Center, room 210. YALSA adheres to an open board meeting policy which means we welcome all conference attendees and their contributions with the same respect afforded to fellow board members as detailed in this document.  Visitors to the board meeting are encouraged to share information and ask questions during the Open Forum part of the meeting, which is always the first item at the meeting.  To learn more about how in-person board meetings function and what to expect, visit the wiki.

YALSA Board members are currently using the YALSAblog to share more information about proposals that will be discussed at Midwinter. Make sure to read those if you want to learn more about what the Board will be considering at Midwinter.

Finally, make sure to check out YALSA at ALA’s 2018 Midwinter Meeting wiki page to find out about all the events YALSA is hosting in Denver. Come learn, network, and celebrate (the exciting Youth Media Awards!) with other YALSA members and supporters.

Safe travels to those of you coming to Denver. If you can’t be there in person, make sure to follow #alamw18 and @yalsa on Twitter.  For the ALA Youth Media Awards, follow #alayma

As always, thanks for what you do for YALSA and for teens!

Respectfully,
Sandra Hughes-Hassell
YALSA President 2017-2018

YALSA #alamw18 Board Document #22: Member Grants & Awards Next Steps

In order to maintain a robust and timely organization, an occasional evaluation of the awards, grants and fellowships presented to membership must be undertaken. A member survey done in 2017 indicated that members were interested in having the governing body re-evaluate some of the awards, grants and fellowships to suit the current needs of the organization. With this information in mind, a task force was set up to distill the findings of the survey and make recommendations to the Board at the 2017 Annual Conference in Chicago.

The Fund and Partner Development Standing Committee of the YALSA Board then looked at those recommendations to determine the feasibility of them based on what YALSA finances would allow and to determine if any of the awards, grants and fellowships needed to be discontinued or others to be added. The committee also looked at concerns about how the awards were marketed to the membership and if the eligibility language of the awards was clearly spelled out so that those members who could apply would. The Fund and Partner Development Standing Committee brings forth the recommendations in Board Document #22.

Overview

The Fund and Partner Development Standing Committee was given the task to appraise the findings of the Member Awards Evaluation Taskforce for YALSA and its members. Based on this information, the FPD Standing Committee has issued the proposals below for each of the existing YALSA Awards.

Recommended Board Actions

• The YALSA Board Directs the President to appoint two short term member groups to develop a proposal for each of the two new awards, and to submit them to the Board for review for their June 2018 meeting.
• The YALSA Board directs the Executive Director to work with staff to expand the focus of the MAE Award and Collection Development Grant.
• The YALSA Board directs the Fund and Partner Development Committee to work with the Executive Director to identify potential award sponsors and reach out to them.
• The YALSA Board approves the recommendation to discontinue the Midwinter Paper Presentation and directs the Executive Director to work with staff to carry out the necessary work to sunset the grant.

See the full report here.

Respectfully submitted,
Todd Krueger
YALSA Division Councilor

YALSA Board #alamw18: Advocacy Resources Inventory

YALSA’s Organizational Plan has three goals, one of which is advocacy.  As part of this goal, YALSA seeks to provide resources to members to help them be effective advocates.  The 2017 – 2018 Implementation Plan approved by the YALSA Board of Directors at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference states that someone should “inventory YALSA advocacy resources. Update those deemed useful and ensure consistency of language and messages across resources. Sunset other resources whose shelf life has expired. Organize all advocacy resources into a more user-friendly format and develop an advocacy curriculum based on them.”
In order for this work to be completed, two members of the Advocacy Standing Board Committee, Kate McNair and Derek Ivie, are asking the Board to recruit a YALSA member to tackle these tasks.  You can read more about the tasks in Board Document #20, in which the recommended action is that the “Board directs the YALSA President to appoint a member volunteer by Mar. 1, 2018 which will inventory YALSA’s portfolio of advocacy resources and provide recommendations to the board by no later than May 22, 2018.”  Does this sound interesting to you? Contact YALSA President, Sandra Hughes-Hassell, to find out more information about the position.
Sarah Hill, YALSA Immediate Past-President

YALSA Board  #alamw18: Board Development Committee Processes

At the 2016 ALA Annual Conference, the YALSA Board voted to expand the Governance Nominating Committee into a Board Development Committee, to support the reorganization of YALSA in alignment with the new Organizational Plan. At the 2017 ALA Midwinter Meeting, the Board reviewed and approved a proposal which provided a plan for transitioning to a Board Development Committee, and a directive was given to create a small, ad-hoc workgroup to develop a manual for the Board Development Committee that officially began work January 1st.
Board Document #31 was created by that workgroup, consisting of Sarah Hill, Todd Krueger, Shannon Peterson and Sarah Sogigian. Once the board approves the shorter timespan of the committee, the newly developed Board Development Committee will begin its work!
Have you thought about serving on the YALSA Board in some way? There are tons of benefits, and I’ve found it extremely rewarding.  Check out this FAQ about running for a board position, and please contact me at gsarahthelibrarian @ gmail.com if you have any questions.
Sarah Hill, YALSA Immediate Past-President

ALA Council update since the ALA17 Conference in Chicago

1. Educational requirements for the next ALA Executive Director

Council has been preoccupied with discussion and voting on the educational requirements for the next ALA Executive Director. As was outlined in the YALSA blog post, making a decision whether or not this position requires the MLIS or CAEP-equivalent has been an ongoing battle. Currently the petition that asked the decision to be put in the hands in the membership as a whole has received enough signatures to put the measure on the spring ALA ballot.

2. Resolutions & Youth Council Caucus

There have not yet been any resolutions brought forward as of January 15. The Councilor will keep the Board apprised if and as resolutions are submitted. There have been no resolutions discussed among the members of the Youth Council Caucus at this time, aside from a couple memorial resolutions.

3. Moving Meetings out of Texas

A Councilor inquired about the possibility of moving the 2022 MW meeting out of San Antonio due to “bathroom bill” legislation before the Texas assembly. The American Association of Law Libraries had announced that they would no longer hold conferences in Texas for this reason. A robust online discussion followed, which included some providing reasons for maintaining the MW22 site and others decrying it. California’s law prohibiting state-funded travel to eight states, including Texas, was discussed. PLA’s 2020 conference in Nashville, Tennessee, slated to occur in another of those eight states, was also mentioned. Jim Neal and the Executive Board were to discuss this matter, but there has been no announcement about a decision at this time.

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ALA Midwinter 2018: Packing for a trip to Denver

My dad always says, only fools and newcomers predict the weather in Colorado, and I’ve been here too long to be a newcomer. Since he was born here, we always accepted that as gospel and take every weather prediction with a grain of salt. In February, the weather in Denver can range between a high of 10 and 70 degrees without causing the natives to blink. It can be sunny, cloudy, rainy, snowy or windy and usually at some time during the day it will change. Packing for a visit can be a challenge.

It’s true that weather forecasting has improved since my father’s day, but be prepared for surprises. Layers are the answer – and lots of them. Something for a sunny day and something for a cold day with everything in between. The Convention Center will have food of course, but there are dozens of more interesting restaurants a short walk away. Even walking two blocks to the Sixteenth Street Free Mall Ride can be a quick way to get up and down to many destinations, and you’ll want the right gear for those short jaunts. I recommend wool socks, shoes with some tread, cardigans that can tie around the waist if it’s warm and button up tight if it’s cold. Scarves or pashminas are another protective layer to add when it turns nippy but shed easily when the sun shines. Don’t forget a hat and gloves. The hat is useful if it’s sunny and a real bonus if it’s cold. Evenings are almost always cool to downright cold. If you plan to be out and about, that’s the time to be sure you have your warmest layers with you.

When you come to Denver you are arriving at a mile above sea level, and this has an effect on your body that is not always immediately noticeable. Drink water! This is the single thing that everyone advises. Also, it’s important to eat regular meals and cut back on caffeine and alcohol. Many people complain of headaches, and while aspirin or Advil can help, the best advice is to hydrate and eat regularly. Your body will need fuel. You may also notice that you are tired and yawning. Given the conference schedule, it is hard to get enough rest, but a catnap or two will be of great benefit. The first day is the hardest; be extra gentle with yourself and give your body time to adjust. A few days into the schedule will be better than when you first arrive.

Denver’s a great city with lots to do. There’s a ice skating rink downtown, wonderful museums, a fabulous library. I’m sure you’ll enjoy my home town! We offer a western welcome and don’t be surprised if people say hello as you walk down the street. Enjoy your visit and ALA Midwinter 2018!

Recently retired from Denver Public Library, Carol Edwards grew up in Denver and is a second generation native. Her home is known to extended family as Chez Carol and she’s heard a great deal of discussion of how hard it is to pack for a visit to Colorado and the impact of high altitude. Carol doesn’t claim to be an expert, just someone who wants everyone to have a great visit for ALA Midwinter. 

YALSA Symposium Inspiration from a Stipend Winner

As a young librarian, it can be difficult to find your footing. After receiving my degree and being a teen services librarian for a little over a year, I was thrilled to embark on the journey to Louisville in early November for this year’s YALSA Symposium, made possible by YALSA’s travel stipend. I was expecting a weekend full of information and new ideas, but I wasn’t expecting to come home with a new outlook on teen services and a reinvigorated passion for my job, which is exactly what happened!

Teens often feel like no one understands or cares about them, and I hear

this often from the teens that frequent my library. At the Symposium I realized that bringing them into the library wasn’t enough – I had to build a community of teens that supported one another and could make changes within their own communities, as adults are separate from the lives of teens in so many ways. Nearly every session I attended in Louisville focused on communities in some way, through either building a community of teens or drawing the surrounding community into the library through partnerships and local resources.
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ALA Midwinter 2018: Fun Places to Visit in Denver

There are loads of things to do while you are in Denver for ALA Midwinter! To take a break from the conference and see the city I would recommend taking in at least two of my top 5 places to visit.

  1. Downtown Aquarium

The Downtown Aquarium in Denver is my top choice for things to do. It could be because I love seeing things up close, it could be because I love going at my own pace, or it could simply be because Colorado is a land locked state so seeing tropical fish is super fun!  Although it is a little pricey, the experience is worth it and once in the building, you can go through as many times as you would like. The Aquarium also has a 4-D Theater for those that really want to “feel” the experience. A must-see when you are in Denver.

  1. Denver Zoo

Number two of top things to do in Denver when taking a break from ALA Midwinter is the Denver Zoo! The Denver Zoo is a wonderful experience and a great way to relax after a busy day at ALA Midwinter.  The Zoo is laid out to include many different climates for different types of animals so you will get your steps in.  As an added fun bonus, you can purchase beer at the zoo and enjoy a cold one as you get to experience all the sights and sounds of the numerous animals.

  1. Denver Museum of Nature & Science

No visit to Denver is complete without a visit to the nature and science museum! The hands-on experience you will get at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science will ignite anyone’s curiosity for sure. With Bill Nye speaking at ALA Midwinter, it is a great tie-in to what will be experienced at the conference.

  1. Denver Botanic Gardens

With all the focus on animals, don’t forget to give plants some love while you are in Denver. The Denver Botanic Gardens is another great adventure to see plants both native and not native to the Colorado region. Take a walk through and enjoy the peaceful experience of the gardens.

  1. Denver Art Museum

To round out my top 5 places to visit in Denver, escape to the Denver Art Museum. The traditionalist and the modern artist will find peace in the galleries.  Many exhibitions will be open during ALA Midwinter including “Revealing a Mexican Masterpiece: The Virgin of Valvanera”, “Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon”, “Stampede: Animals in Art”, and “Past the Tangled Present”.  Also opening on February 11th, the exhibit “Degas: A Passion for Perfection”.  The Denver Art Museum is the sole American venue for this exhibition.

*Bonus Activity!

Because I couldn’t just end at 5 things, take in a show at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts while in town. Choose from 4 different shows during the weekend of ALA Midwinter.  All are sure to be a fun time!

Antonia Krupicka-Smith is the Adult and Teen Services Manager for Library 21c of the Pikes Peak Library District in Colorado Springs, CO.  She loves all things science which is clear in what she thinks is best to do in Denver!

ALA Midwinter 2018: Yummy Places to Eat in Denver

Denver has some amazing restaurants! While reading this post, you’ll discover that I’d never make it as a food critic. That said, I do enjoy really tasty food and have a very particular sister-in-law who has introduced me to some excellent places.

Pasta – gluten free, too.

Angelos Taverna puts together some mean pasta dishes – and has delicious gluten free pasta (the additional $5 is worth it).  The Gorgonzola Steak Fettuccine was wonderful.

Something a bit fancy!

Corridor 44 in Larimer Square is a small but neat place to try. They do lots of fun drinks with champagne. Their food ranges from Scottish salmon to beet salad to a short rib melt. I highly suggest that short rib melt. Nighttime at Larimer Square is a lovely place to walk around even if you aren’t going to eat in the area. 

Want a quick treat?

The Market at Larimer Square is a fun spot with a variety of baked goods, fresh salads, and hot drinks. The teas warm me up on a cold day!

Dive bar food with lots of class

As their website says, “Fried chicken and champagne? Why the hell not?” Max’s Wine Dive in Denver has a great atmosphere and a wonderful wine list to go with the fried chicken (gluten free option, too). Checkout their website – lots of tasty items including sweet potato donuts at brunch!

Your party can’t agree?

Try Avanti: they have loads of choices. Think food truck style, but enclosed. There are seven different vendors in the space – I’ve tried most and they are good. American Grind, Brava! Pizzeria Della Strada, Chow Morso, Kaya Kitchen, QuickFish, Quiero Arepas, and The Regional.

Like I said above, I’m not a food critic – there are only so many ways that I know how to say that something is yummy. Enjoy exploring Denver and all the delicious places we have to eat.

 

Joanna Nelson Rendón is an adult services manager and the young adult services division head for Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs, Colorado. She is an adjunct professor for the University of Denver’s MLIS program and is on their Program Advisory Board. Joanna is the co-chair for the Colorado Association of Libraries’ Leadership Development. She is a blogger for Public Libraries Online. Joanna loves hiking, salsa dancing, and, of course, reading!