Why ALA is Going to be Awesome

My mother is a crazy, enthusiastic children’s librarian and I am her crazy, librarian-wannabe daughter which means that ALA is like Disney World for the two of us. I’m lucky that she’s my mom because otherwise I might not even know what ALA stands for.

But she is, and I do, and now we’re getting ready for our second trip to the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC. As a teenager and not technically a librarian yet (even though I like to pretend that I already am) ALA is all about fun for me. Of course, I’m such a librarian nerd that even sessions about RefWorks are pretty thrilling but the true magic happens in the Exhibits Hall.

So, with excitement and antici…pation running through my book nerdy veins, I thought that I would write a list of the top ten things I hope I can tell you about in my post-conference post:

  1. Meeting Lauren Oliver and telling her that Before I Fall was one of the most beautiful novels that I have ever read. When you start a novel wanting to punch the main character in the face and end a novel crying because you know she has to die, you know you’ve just experienced something that doesn’t happen very often.
  2. Congratulating Libba Bray on her Printz Award and tell her that I TOTALLY saw it coming, because honestly, how could I not? I think she might also like to know that I am now the proud owner of a growing lawn gnome collection, all thanks to her.
  3. Participating in Libraries Build Communities again.
  4. Attending the YA Author Coffee Klatch and trying to contain my giddiness, especially if John Green is anywhere in the vicinity.
  5. Waiting just outside the Exhibits Hall just before they open and making a mad dash for all of the major publishers before the really good ARCs are gone.
  6. Talking about books with the Best Fiction for Young Adults panel (including my fabulous VOYA partner, Alissa Lauzon)
  7. Planning to fan girl every YA author I can find but ending up just staring at them in awe while my mother tells them how much I talk about their books.
  8. Recreating another serendipitous moment where I turn the corner and there is STEPHEN CHBOSKY signing The Perks of Being a Wallflower .
  9. Wandering through the Exhibits Hall pulling the “I am an eager teen reader. Please give me books” card.
  10. Being around a bunch of librarians who are as excited about books as I am.

I have no doubt that no matter how many of these things I actually get to do, I will still manage to have a great time, learn a lot, and get a ton of awesome ARCs. See you there!

Serving the “new” largest generation in history!

As a Baby Boomer, I have always been a bit smug about my generation’s effect on American society. Because of our sheer numbers, we have influenced opinions and procedures regarding public education, child-rearing, music, home ownership, and yes, even menopause. I’m confident my generation will continue to demand change as we move into retirement and old age.

My conceit at being part of this highly-influential demographic was humbled recently, however. I read a report stating when the 2010 census is complete, the Baby Boom generation will officially lose its number-one status. Due to rising immigration as much as to rising birth rates, the Millennial generation is now the largest demographic group in America.

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D.C. Tips – Visit the National Harbor and Old Towne Alexandria

There is something for everyone at the National Harbor with fun and exciting restaurants like Ketchup to the ritzy like, Graces Mandarin. If you don’t need ambiance and a good sandwich is what you are in store for; try Potbelly Sandwich Works. Those folks watching their weight should stay far away from Cake Love and Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream. Cake Love is a dream bakery created by Food network host and a DC local Warren Brown. Cake Love has your favorite cakes but better than you remember. After eating, walk off those extra pounds. Stop in the Gaylord Hotel and enjoy the Atrium. Then take a relaxing water taxi ride into Old Towne Alexandria. There is plenty to see and do in Old Towne; from the street performers to the mall. There is even a park if you want to play Frisbee, walk a dog or just chill. If it’s been too long since your last meal, Old Towne has great restaurants too. The great thing is you’ll definitely be able to walk off the pounds in Old Towne. Great shops here as well. Between the two places you can spend an entire day.

The YALSA Update: Special Annual Edition!

Advanced registration for ALA Annual Conference ends next Friday, May 14! Registering before advanced registration ends can save YALSA members $50 over onsite fees. Register today!

YALSA has a lot planned for Annual this year! You can download a full schedule of events and meetings (PDF) and find details on the conference and DC at the YALSA Annual Wiki.

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D.C. Tips – The Newseum

Better late than never — this is the final post in Museums Month!

One of Washington D.C.’s newest museums is the Newseum, devoted to the history of news.’  The front of the building includes a stone wall engraved with the beginning section of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.’  This overlooks Pennsylvania Avenue, making it something every president will see on his or her Inauguration Day parade route.’  The lobby of the museum displays the daily front page of 80 newspapers from around the world.

ALA’s Scholarship Bash will take place at the Newseum this year on Saturday, June 26, from 7 to 11 p.m. Tax-deductible tickets include admission to the Newseum and cost $40 before conference and $45 onsite. Learn more and register at the ALA Annual Scholarship Bash page.

Permanent exhibits within the museum cover a variety of topics, including the flow of news, news in the Web 2.0 world, and photography in the news.’  Major events also receive their own exhibits, including 9/11, Watergate, and the fall of the Berlin Wall.’  (The Newseum claims to hold the largest collection of Berlin Wall pieces outside of Germany!)’  A map displays the current condition of free press around the world, which recently changed a bit according to a story in the Washington Post.’  Special exhibits that are currently on display are devote to Elvis, Sports Illustrated Photography, Tim Russert, and the one I am dying to see – First Dogs: Presidential Pets in the White House.

The Newseum does charge admission but the tickets are good for two days.’  Tickets purchased online receive a 10% discount.’  If you are not able to visit the Newseum, the website is worth exploring.’  It has resources for students and teachers, games, and even a virtual tour of the museum.

Other museums we did not cover during Museum Month but worth checking out include O Mansion, African American Civil War Memorial and Museum, National Museum of Health and Medicine, and the National Museum of Crime and Punishment.

As we get closer to Annual, are there any other topics’  you would like the Local Arrangements Committee to cover?’  Leave a comment and let us know!

YALSA 101 @ Annual 2010

Are you new to YALSA?’  Wondering what the Young Adult Library Services division of ALA is? Are you thinking, how can this organization help me?’  Then YALSA 101 is for you!’ 

Learn more about YALSA in this mixer-style orientation, where you can get an overview of the organization and its activities. New members and those considering membership will learn more about the benefits of joining YALSA. Established members are also encouraged to attend, YALSA 101 is a great networking opportunity!

Stay tuned for information regarding “presenters” at this great event!

The YALSA Update: Advocacy, Great Ideas, and So Much More

Win up to $1K to attend Library Advocacy Day YALSA will offer travel stipends of up to $1,000 each to five YALSA members to participate in ALA’s Library Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C. on June 29, 2010, held in conjunction with ALA Annual Conference. Applications are available as a PDF or Word document. They can also be downloaded at YALSA’s Awards and Grants page and must be sent to yalsa@ala.org. Applications are due today, so be sure to get yours in!

Share your Great Idea You can win a prize from YALSA! Do you have a great idea to support YALSA’s goals in its strategic plan (PDF)? Share them with YALSA and you could win a prizes worth up to $250. Download an entry form (Word doc) today. Entries are due by May 1.

May 20, VIPs: Why You Need Them for Advocacy Webinar: Karen Keys will explore how librarians and library workers can help grow their library program by improving communication and developing professional relationships with local town councilors, school board members, Chamber of Commerce members, etc. This webinar will take place Thursday, May 20, at 2 p.m. Eastern. Register today! Registration costs $39 for individual YALSA members, $49 for all other individuals. A group rate of $195 is available by contacting Eve Gaus at egaus@ala.org or 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5293. Learn more about our webinars at www.ala.org/yalsa/webinars. Save the date for our June 17 webinar on YA Classics, led by Sarah Debraski.

First Wednesdays with YALSA: YALSA’s First Wednesdays continue with an online chat on May 5 at 8 p.m. Eastern, this time on encouraging reading by using Web 2.0 tools, hosted by Wendy Stephens. We will be using a private room in Meebo for the chat; the password to log in is available to YALSA members at this ALA Connect post. See you next Wednesday!

YALS at San Jose State’s SLIS Sarah Flowers, editor of Young Adult Library Services, discussed writing for professional journals for San Jose State University’s SLIS Colloquia. Watch the webcast today!

After the jump, learn more about summer e-course registration, applying to our NEW mentoring program, becoming a YA Galley Group, registering for Teen Read Week and the WrestleMania Reading Challenge, and YALSA’s Annual preconferences!

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$50 Advocacy Preconference at ALA Annual!

Reserve your spot today for “Advocating in a Tough Economy: An Advocacy Institute Workshop” during ALA’s 2010 Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. Advanced registration is economically priced at $50 for the half-day program and will be available until May 14, 2010.

Learn how to better advocate for your library throughout this recession, and get the facts on frontline advocacy, the newest initiative from ALA President Camila Alire. Breakout sessions will focus on maintaining your budget, working with decision-makers, tips for a successful campaign and fundraising, and melding tradition and social networking to create positive messaging.

The program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, June 25, at the Grand Hyatt Washington. For more information and to register, please visit, http://www.ala.org/advocacyinstitute.

Advocating in a Tough Economy: An Advocacy Institute Workshop is co-sponsored by the Delaware Library Association, the Maryland Library Association, the Virginia Library Association, and the Washington, D.C. Library Association. It is organized by the Advocacy Training Subcommittee of the ALA Committee on Library Advocacy, in conjunction with the ALA Office for Library Advocacy, the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations (ALTAFF), the ALA Chapter Relations Office, and the ALA Office of Government Relations.

The YALSA Update: Travel stipends, Great Ideas, registration & more!

Win up to $1K to attend Library Advocacy Day YALSA will offer travel stipends of up to $1,000 each to five YALSA members to participate in ALA’s Library Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C. on June 29, 2010, held in conjunction with ALA Annual Conference. Applications are available as a PDF or Word document. They can also be downloaded at YALSA’s Awards and Grants page and must be sent to yalsa@ala.org. Applications are due one week from today, so be sure to get yours in!

William McKinley High School of Lima, Ohio, celebrates Teen Tech Week The kids on Glee went to the library last week. At about the sixteen-minute mark, you’ll see a familiar poster in the background.

Share your Great Idea You can win a prize from YALSA! Do you have a great idea to support YALSA’s goals in its strategic plan (PDF)? Share them with YALSA and you could win a prizes worth up to $250. Download an entry form (Word doc) today. Entries are due by May 1.

Register for our next webinar on advocacy Karen Keys will lead an hourlong webinar called VIPs: Why You Need Them for Advocacy on May 20 at 2 p.m. Eastern. Karen will explore how librarians and library workers can help grow their library program by improving communication and developing professional relationships with local town councilors, school board members, Chamber of Commerce members, and so on. Registration costs $39 for individual YALSA members, $49 for all other individuals and $195 for groups. Contact Eve Gaus at egaus@ala.org or 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5293 for more information.’  Mark your calendar for June 17, when Sarah Debraski will lead a webinar on YA classics.

After the jump, find out how you can save on early bird registration for YALSA’s YA Lit Symposium and ALA’s Annual Conference, sign up for YALSA’s Annual preconferences, register for Teen Read Week and the WrestleMania Reading Challenge, and more!

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