Sit Down and Vote!

Yesterday afternoon I received my ALA/YALSA ballot information and first thing this morning I cast my votes in the YALSA and ALA elections. Before voting I made sure I was prepared. I read through all of the information on this blog about each of the YALSA candidates, I listened to the podcasts of the candidates for YALSA governance positions, and I read through the sample ballot. That might seem like a lot of work, but I think it’s well worth it because I was then easily able to sit down at my computer and make my election selections.

All YALSA members want to do the same. While the preparation can take time, it’s up to you (and me) to make sure that YALSA is the organization that we want and need. Without the prep of reading and listening then it’s not as easy to make good decisions for the association.

If you haven’t received your ballot information via email, (and were a member in good standing on January 31, 2012) you should receive it sometime this week. Polls are open through April. However, why not vote early and get this important professional task done? It’s worth it to you and to YALSA to sit down and vote!

YALSA Election 2012: An Election Guide

It’s just about time for you to cast your vote in the 2012 YALSA election. The association’s 2012 Nominating Committee wants to make it as seamless as possible for you to make your selections and cast your ballot. Over the past few week’s we’ve worked to do that by providing information on candidates, the process, and the positions up for a vote. Now, we’ve put together a handy 2012 election guide for you to use as you continue to prepare. In the guide you will find all of the posts from the past few months on the election. You’ll also find a sample ballot which includes an example of the actual ballot along with the biographical and professional information for each of the candidates running for a YALSA position. You can read through before going online to cast your ballot. That way you’ll be all ready for voting day.

In just under two weeks you’ll receive an email from ALA with your voting information, it should arrive in your email as part of a 48 hour email blast between March 19 and March 21. The polls are open from March 19 through April 27.

Remember, by voting in the election you have the opportunity to help guarantee that YALSA is the association you want it to be. By the way, there is more information on candidates still to come. Over the next few days audio interviews with each of the candidates running for governance positions will be posted on the YALSABlog, stay tuned.

Online Town Halls Through MySpace

After Labor Day, twelve presidential candidates will be physically present at a college campus and accessible online through MySpace in interactive town halls reports USA Today. The discussion will be web casted so that MySpace members can submit their questions as well. Host a library program where teens can watch the web cast and participate as MySpace members to ask questions.

Posted by Kelly Czarnecki

YouTube-You Choose

This month, YouTube set up a hub for candidates here. According to the Charlotte Observer, “In this contest, Barack Obama leads handily. Obama, who was ahead of most of the competition by getting himself up on YouTube six months ago, had more than 627,400 views of his channel as of Tuesday. Several of his 21 videos have been watched by 100,000 plus.”

Posted by Kelly Czarnecki

YouTube politics

Candidates have been using YouTube to announce that they are going to run, and have been put on YouTube many a times by others to point out embarassing moments. This short CNN video explains how YouTube is inviting the candidates to post their own video messages for free on their site. The video mentions author Thomas Hollihan’s 2001 book: Uncivil Wars: Political Campaigns in a Media Age. A lot has changed since then (Second Life wasn’t even out!) What do people think about the candidates using YouTube? What affect might it have? Do you notice teens using media in different ways when running for positions in school? What affect might it have not to be able to access the sites in schools or libraries if wanting to use the technology to help a campaign?

Posted by Kelly Czarnecki