YALSA Seeks New Editor for Research Journal, JRLYA

YALSA seeks a new member editor for its research journal, The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA). The member editor will serve a one-year term starting July 1, 2018, with an opportunity for extension based on performance. The member editor will receive an honorarium of $1,000 per year plus up to $1,000 total in travel support for attending the ALA Midwinter Meeting, ALA Annual Conference, and/or YALSA Symposium during the term of contract.

The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults is an open-access, peer-reviewed online research journal. Its purpose is to enhance the development of theory, research, and practices to support young adult library services, as emphasized in YALSA’s National Research Agenda.

Responsibilities of the member editor include, but are not limited to:

  • Set and maintain the scope and tone of the journal both textually and visually
  • Solicit and gather content for the journal with the help of the journal’s Advisory Board
  • Manage and review work of contributors and communicate with them on a regular basis
  • Supervise the editing of manuscripts according to the Chicago Manual of Style (including rewriting, reorganizing, validating information in content, etc. as needed).
  • Serve as spokesperson for the journal
  • Maintain the highest degree of integrity and ethical standards as member editor
  • Attend YALSA’s Symposium, ALA’s Annual Conference, and/or Midwinter Meeting to assist YALSA with promoting the publication and also to solicit contributors
    • Prepare reports for YALSA’s Board of Directors, to be turned in one month before ALA’s Annual Conferences and Midwinter Meetings
    • Attend programs relevant to young adult library services at the ALA Annual Conference and recruit strong presenters to submit their work
  • Work with YALSA’s Communications Specialist to determine schedules for publication and help maintain an appropriate web and social media presence for the journal
  • Perform other duties as needed

Submit resume and cover letter to Anna Lam at alam@ala.org by April 1, 2018.

Call for Papers: Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults

Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA), the official research journal of YALSA, is currently accepting submissions for a special themed issue. It will highlight research related to social justice issues and public and school library services for teens. Researchers, librarians, graduate students, and others who conduct research related to teens (ages 12 – 18) and libraries are invited to submit manuscripts. Papers describing both scholarly research (qualitative, quantitative, or theory development) as well as action research are welcome for peer review and consideration of publication. Papers that report library programs but lack an original research component will not be considered.

View the writer’s guidelines here. Email manuscripts by December 5, 2016, to editor Denise Agosto at: yalsaresearch@gmail.com.

JRLYA is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal located. Its purpose is to enhance the development of theory, research, and practice to support young adult library services. JRLYA presents original research concerning: 1) the informational and developmental needs of teens; 2) the management, implementation, and evaluation of young adult library services; and 3) other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with this population.

 

NEW ISSUE OF JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON LIBRARIES & YOUNG ADULTS PUBLISHED

The newest issue of YALSA’s Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults (JRLYA) is now published and freely available online at: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/. It includes two award-winning papers from YALSA’s Midwinter Paper Presentation series and two additional research papers describing recent research related to teens and library services.

Mega Subramaniam’s paper “Designing the Library of the Future for and with Teens: Librarians as the ‘Connector’ in Connected Learning” won the 2015 YALSA Midwinter Paper Presentation award. In her paper, Prof. Subramaniam describes the basic concepts of connected learning and discusses five cooperative inquiry techniques that librarians can adapt for use in working with teens to design library programs and services. Each technique creates design partnerships between adults and teens, building on the concept of connect learning and enabling teens to take active roles in their own learning and library programming. The five design techniques include: “bags of stuff,”  “mission to Mars,” “layered elaboration,” “big paper,” and “sticky noting.”

Kyungwon Koh and June Abbas received the 2016 YALSA Midwinter Paper Presentation award for their paper entitled: “Competencies Needed to Provide Teen Library Services of the Future: A Survey of Professionals in Learning Labs and Makerspaces.” They discuss their survey of information professionals who manage makerspaces and other learning spaces in libraries and museums. The survey results reveal common job responsibilities and the major skills and knowledge needed for effective management of these spaces. The survey findings have much to teach us as the field of teen librarianship moves toward continued broadening of the role of libraries as informal education institutions.

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New issue of JRLYA

Volume 7, Issue 1, of YALSA’s Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults (JRLYA) is now available online at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/all-volumes/.  This newest issue features research papers relating to teens, libraries, and LGBT issues.

In the first paper, “‘They Kind of Rely on the Library’: School Librarians Serving LGBT Students,” author Shannon Oltmann examined school librarians’ perspectives on collecting LGBT materials to show that school librarians generally support collecting them and positioning their libraries as safe, supportive spaces.

With his paper “Sex in the Stacks: Teenager Sex Education Information Seeking Behavior and Barriers to the Use of Library Resources,” Kyle Marshall focused on understanding the information sources teens use to gather sex education information, including curricular materials, interpersonal sources, digital media, and print sources. The teens in his study relied on a wide variety of resources for their sex education information needs, yet none relied on libraries when looking for sex education information.

Moving to a focus on library collections, Elizabeth Chapman and Briony Birdi analyzed 13 British public library collections to look for LGBTQ teen fiction holdings. As the title of their paper, “‘It’s Woefully Inadequate’: Collections of LGBTQ Fiction for Teens in English Public Library Services” suggests, they found generally limited holdings of LGBTQ fiction materials, regardless of library size or budget.

Lastly, in their paper “The Curriculum Materials Library as a Hub of Resources, Literacy Practices, and Collaboration: Expanding the Role of the Library to Support Foster Youth,” Yonty Friesem, Kelsey Greene, and Mona Niedbala show that organizational vision and relationship; structure, responsibilities, and communication; authority and accountability; and resources and rewards are all crucial to the creation and maintenance of successful ongoing collaborations between libraries and other organizations that serve teens.

JRLYA is YALSA’s open-access, peer-reviewed research journal. It aims to enhance the development of theory, research, and practice to support teen library services. JRLYA presents original research concerning: 1) the informational and developmental needs of teens; 2) the management, implementation, and evaluation of young adult library services; and 3) other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with teens. If you’re interested in publishing your research in JRLYA, see the writer’s guidelines at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/ or send queries to editor Denise Agosto at mailto:dea22@drexel.edu.

Submitted by: Denise E. Agosto, editor, JRLYA

 

YALSA Writing Award Winners

As the chair of the inaugural YALSA Writing Award Jury, I am proud to announce the four outstanding pieces of writing contributed by YALSA members last year. After receiving a shortlist of nominations from the respective publications’ editors and managers, our committee carefully considered each of the article’s merits to select the winners. Without further ado, here are the winning articles:
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Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults: Call for papers

As Chair of the Research Journal Editorial Advisory Board, I’m very pleased to share this call for papers for the Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. JRLYA is YALSA’s spanking new online research journal. Check out the guidelines and give it a go!

Call for Papers: The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults

The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, the official research journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), is an online open-access, peer-reviewed journal.’  The purpose of Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults is to enhance the development of theory, research, and practices to support young adult library services. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults presents high quality original research concerning the informational and developmental needs of young adults; the management, implementation, and evaluation of library services for young adults; and other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with young adults. The journal also includes literary and cultural analyses of classic and contemporary writing for young adults. Manuscripts are currently being accepted for the Fall issue. Please submit your manuscript by September 1, 2011.

Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults invites manuscripts based on original qualitative, quantitative, synthetic, or mixed method research; an innovative conceptual framework; or a substantial literature review that opens new areas of inquiry and investigation.’  Case studies and works of literary analysis are also welcome. The journal’s editorial board recognizes the contributions that other disciplines make to expanding and enriching theory, research, and practice in young adult library services and encourages submissions from researchers, students, and practitioners in all fields.

The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults uses the Chicago Manual of Style endnotes.’  For complete author guidelines including examples of citations, please visit the author guidelines.’  While submissions average 4,000 to 7,000 words, manuscripts of all lengths will be considered.’  Full color images, photos, and other media are all accepted.

Please contact Editor Sandra Hughes-Hassell at yalsaresearch@gmail.com‘  to discuss submissions and author guidelines.’  All completed manuscripts should be submitted as email attachments to yalsaresearch@gmail.com.’  Please attach each figure or graphic as a separate file.

The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults is available online at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya.