App of the Week: Nearpod

nearpod

Title: Nearpod
Cost: Free, though many slidedecks are available as supplemental purchases
Platform: iOS and Android

As enthusiastic about tablets as I happen to be, I’ve been leery of the educational technologists suggesting mobile devices can replace more robust computers for teaching and learning. Nearpod was, quite frankly, the first tablet-based technology to make me gasp at its possibilities.

The backend is not unlike slideshare — you upload your files and publish them through the nearpod interface, and have the ability to embed assessments, too. A “live” session generate a PIN for students to follow along, and stydent viewers are visible in-app from a roster. Nearpod instructors have persistent access to anything uploaded into their library, but you can also purchase NPPs, sets of canned presentations on curricular topics, for an average of $10 for 12 in themed collections. Continue reading App of the Week: Nearpod

Seeing it from the Other Side

This summer, after working with teens in public libraries for seven years straight, I made a career change and now I am an elementary school librarian in a large urban school district. I will be writing a series of blog posts about my new position and the perspectives I’m gaining from my life on the school side of library services to children.

Jumping from one service group to another has been an enlightening experience, to say the least. My school serves children in grades K-4, so I’ve been switching gears to picture books, early readers and chapter books. The kids at my school can mostly be classified as struggling readers, but their enthusiasm for books and the library is very strong, and I hope that trend will continue with my help throughout the school year.

One big difference in this new job is that I am dealing with different stakeholders. At my last public library position, I served teens who wanted to be there and were interested in the materials and services we offered. Sometimes their parents directed their reading choices, but for the most part, they could check out whatever they wanted. Continue reading Seeing it from the Other Side