Research Roundup: Social and Emotional Learning

Welcome to Research Roundup. The purpose of this recurring column is to make the vast amount of research related to youth and families accessible to you.

While preparing the Research Roundup on Social and Emotional Learning for the Winter issue of YALS, I learned that there would be a flurry of publishing in late 2018 and early 2019 in the field of social and emotional learning. This update highlights some of these developments:

  • The Aspen Institute’s National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development released From a Nation at Risk to a Nation of Hope in January 2019. It is the result of two years of study and conversations with experts, practitioners, and parents across the nation. It provides synthesis, case studies and recommendations for future work.  The report makes six recommendations:
    • Set a clear vision that broadens the definition of student success to prioritize the whole child.
    • Transform learning settings so they are safe and supportive for all young people.
    • Change instruction to teach students social, emotional, and cognitive skills; embed these skills in academics and school wide practices.
    • Build adult expertise in child development.
    • Align resources and leverage partners in the community to address the whole child.
    • Forge closer connections between research and practice by shifting the paradigm for how research gets done.
  • CASEL’s Measuring SEL: Using Data To Inspire Practice has published a number of research briefs. I found this brief particularly useful: Equity & Social and Emotional Learning: A Cultural Analysis. Measuring SEL also hosted two design challenges, which give you the chance to learn about SEL assessment tools developed by practitioners.
  • In December 2018, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation published an issue brief Social and Emotional Development Matters: Taking Action Now for Future Generations which gives an overview of key findings and links to reports on specific aspects of SEL that the foundation developed from 2017 until now.
  • The University of Minnesota recently updated its SEL Toolkit. The toolkit uses the Ways of Being SEL Model developed by the University of Minnesota. It focuses on youth in middle school, but provides many activities that can be adjusted for other ages. Many of these activities are applicable to out-of-school time programming.

Submitted by Committee member Bernie Farrell.

YALS Spring 2017 Resources – From Awareness to Advocacy: An Urban Teen Librarian’s Journey from Passivity to Activism

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now
to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) David Wang’s article describes his personal journey from passivity to activism as his library faced serious financial cuts. His article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

Invest in Libraries: http://www.investinlibraries.org/

Invest in Libraries Rally: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_39MpGQdKTw

YALS Spring 2017 Resources: Using Media Literacy to Combat Youth Extremism

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now
to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) D.C .Vito describes how media literacy can be used to combat youth extremism. His article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

France Robles, (2015, June 20) “Dylann Roof Photos and a Manifesto Are Posted on Website” New York Times.

Jon Anderson (2015, April 20) “Hoover woman joins ISIS: Meet Hoda Muthana who fled U.S. to Syria” Alabama Media Group.

UNESCO “Internet and the Radicalization of Youth: Preventing, Acting and Living Together“.

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YALS 2017 Spring Resources: Libraries as Refuge for Marginalized Youth

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now
to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) Rica G shares her experience of teaching Hip Hop as a way of life and a means to empower youth. Her article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

Brundin, Jenny. “Denver Teachers, Students Are Confronting The Anxiety Of A Trump Presidency.”CPR.org. November 16, 2016. http://www.cpr.org/news/story/denver-teachers-students-are-confronting-the-anxiety-of-a-trump-presidency

Debraski, Sara, Finney, Meg, Kolderup, Gretchen, Lalitha Nataraj, et al. “Core Professional Values for the Teen Services Profession,” Young Adult Library Services Association, July 25, 2015, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/sites/ala.org.yalsa/files/content/YALSA_CoreProfessionalValues.pdf.

National Safe Space. “What is Safe Place?” Nationalsafespace.org. December 22, 2016. http://nationalsafeplace.org/what-is-safe-place/

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YALS Spring 2017 Resources – Making a Case for Teens Services: Transforming Libraries and Publishing 

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS (digital edition available now to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website), Audrey Hopkins describes the connections between literacy and advocacy. Her article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

Bluestone, M. (2015, June 10). U.S. Publishing Industry’s Annual Survey Reveals $28 Billion in Revenue in 2014.  Retrieved from http://publishers.org/news/us-publishing-industry%E2%80%99s-annual-survey-reveals-28-billion-revenue-201

Lee, S.A. (2014, May 5). Beyond Books, Nooks, and Dirty Looks: The History and Evolution of library Services to Teens in the United States. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2014/05/beyond-books-nooks-and-dirty-looks-the-history-and-evolution-of-library-services-to-teens-in-the-united-states/

Strickland, A. (2015, April 15). A brief history of young adult literature. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/15/living/young-adult-fiction-evolution/

 

 

YALS Spring 2017 Resources – CYPHER as Youth Advocacy

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now
to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) Rica G shares her experience of teaching Hip Hop as a way of life and a means to empower youth. Her article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

Clark, Trent. “The 15 Best Snap Music Songs Of All-Time.” Hip-Hop Wired. Hip-Hop Wired, 29 Nov.Web. 13 Feb. 2017. http://hiphopwired.com/483408/15-best-snap-music-songs-of-all-time/

Kelly, Lauren Leigh. “Hip-Hop Literature: The Politics, Poetics, and Power of Hip-Hop in the English Classroom.” The English Journal 102.5 (2013): 51-56. National Council of Teachers of English. Web. http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1025-may2013/EJ1025Hip.pdf

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YALS Spring 2017 Resources – Advocating for Teens in Public Libraries+

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) Tiffany Boeglen and Britni Cherrington-Stodart’s article on advocating for teens in Public Libraries explores ways staff can actively advocate for the teens they serve. Their article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

Act for Youth “U.S. Teen Demographics” -http://www.actforyouth.net/adolescence/demographics/.

National Institute of Health “The Teen Brain Still Under Construction” – https://infocenter.nimh.nih.gov/pubstatic/NIH%2011-4929/NIH%2011-4929.pdf

Search Institute “40 Developmental Assets of Adolescents” – http://www.search-institute.org/content/40-developmental-assets-adolescentsages-12-18

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YALS Spring 2017 Resources – The Library’s Role in Protecting Teens’ Privacy

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) Mary K. Chelton’s recently accepted position paper describes the library’s role in protecting teens’ privacy. Her article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

  1. Project Censored, “The Top Censored Stories of 2015-2016.” Intellectual Freedom News, (November 28, 2016) http://projectcensored.org/14-fbis-new-plan-spy-high-school-students-across-country/
  2. Office of Partner Engagement. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Preventing Violent Extremism in Schools. (January, 2016) https://info.publicintelligence.net/FBI-PreventingExtremismSchools.pdf.
  3. Homeland Security Committee. Final Report of the Task Force on Combating Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel. (September, 2015) https://homeland.house.gov/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/TaskForceFinalReport.pdf
  4. American Association of School Librarians. Standards for the 21st Century Learner http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards/learning.
  5. Tucker, William and Amelia Vance, “School Surveillance: The Consequences for Equity and Privacy” Education Leaders Report Vol. 2, No. 4, (October, 2016) http://www.nasbe.org/education-leader/school-surveillance-the-consequences-for-equity-and-privacy/
  6. Hackman, Rose, “Is the Online Surveillance of Teenagers the New Stop and Frisk?” The Guardian (April 23, 2015) https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/apr/23/online-surveillance-black-teenagers-new-stop-and-frisk
  7. Privacy: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights. Adopted June 19, 2002, by the ALA Council; amended on July 1, 2014. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill/interpretations/privacy
  8. Access to Resources and Services in the School Library Media Program: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights. Adopted July 2, 1986, by the ALA Council; amended January 10, 1990; July 12, 2000; January 19, 2005; July 2, 2008; and July 1, 2014. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill/interpretations/accessresources
  9. Minors and Internet Activity: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of RightsAdopted July 15, 2009, by the ALA Council%3B amended on July 1, 2014http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill/interpretations/minors-internet-activity
  10. “Social Responsibility,” in Core Professional Values for the Teen Services Profession. http://www.ala.org/yalsa/core-professional-values-teen-services-profession

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YALS Spring 2017 Resources – Creating a Unique Brand for Your School Library

In the Spring 2017 issue of YALS, (digital edition available now to members & subscribers via the Members Only section of the YALSA website) Kelsey Barker’s article on creating a unique brand for your school library explains why a brand is an important part of advocacy. Her article includes references and resources that shouldn’t be missed. The full list of those resources follows:

“What Is Advocacy?” American Association of School Librarians. December 15, 2015. Accessed February 04, 2017. http://www.ala.org/aasl/advocacy/definitions.

Young Adult Library Services Association,. 2017. YALSA Advocacy Toolkit 2017. PDF. Young Adult Library Services. http://www.ala.org/yalsa/sites/ala.org.yalsa/files/content/2017%20Advocacy%20Toolkit.pdf.

YALS Spring 2017 – Advocacy

Any day now YALSA members and YALS subscribers should find in their mailboxes the latest issue of YALS. (The digital edition is already available on the Members Only section of the YALSA website.) The Spring 2017 theme is Advocacy and includes articles on:

  • Using media literacy to combat youth extremism
  • Supporting teens understanding privacy and surveillance in digital spaces
  • Teaching Hip Hop as a way of life and a means to empower youth
  • Advocating for teens in public libraries
  • Creating a unique brand for your school library
  • The library as a refuge for marginalized youth
  • Moving from passivity to activism
  • Making a case for teens services

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