Check out the Winter 2022 edition of YALS, the award-winning official journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association. The current issue is available to subscribers and YALSA members on the association’s “Members Only” section on its website. Once at the members only section, you will have to log-in with your ALA account in order to access the content.

Intellectual freedom, freedom to read, academic freedom. We’re all familiar with these phrases, and in so many ways, what we do as librarians and teachers is to protect the very principles of these phrases. Unfortunately, we are at a time in our history where it seems that we are not sure if we are winning battles but losing the war. Over 36 states have introduced bills that, in some way, censors language and/or curriculum and books that are used in classrooms. Political and parent groups are consistently challenging books that are used in school and public libraries and school curriculums. Citizens are even filing criminal complaints about books. Some librarians and teachers have faced this onslaught of challenges head on while others have heard horror stories and worry, even fear, that they will also face a reckoning of some sort. Through it all, however, librarians and teachers must consider what is best for students. 

In this issue we want to consider what happens when we challenge intellectual freedom. This issue is open for articles that provide broad and specific discussions that address questions/topics such as (but not limited to):

  • What happens to our students when we censor the very materials that depict the lives that they lead, their homes, their families? Are they themselves being censored? 
  • What constitutes truth? And, whose truth gets to have representation?
  • How does censoring cause further harm to marginalized groups?
  • Personal experiences of book and/or curriculum challenges
  • Proactive ways to get ahead of challenges?
  • Self-Censorship and the harm that it can cause
  • Teens who advocate for challenged books and curriculums
  • Events and programs that promote Banned Books Week

Please note that this is a volunteer opportunity with no monetary compensation. YALSA has the right to first refusal.

If you have an article idea for this themed issue, please submit article proposals by October 21, 2022. https://www.emailmeform.com/builder/form/3bQc9KldF3R

If you know someone who has experience on this topic and would be interested in writing for YALS or have questions, please contact YALS’ editor, Yolanda Hood

Greetings all! What a year it’s been! We’re a few days into the new year as I wrap up last month. Even in unsettling times, I hope you were able to experience some moments of ease and will continue to do so as we welcome in 2022. Here are some highlights from December:

Membership numbers (reported from August 2021):
Personal members of YALSA: 3,239
Renewals: 201 (this is an 11.6% increase from 2020)
New members: 90 (this is also an increase from 2020)

  • Directed the Board to continue responding to the History of Four EDI Taskforce Report recommendations
  • Submitted a President’s column for upcoming YALS issue. Co-written with social worker. (YALS is a great member-perk! Chock-full of useful information-free to members)
  • Worked on promoting the need for and appointing interested members to YALSA’s Division and Membership Promotion Committee.  (We still have openings to this important committee. Fill out the Committee Volunteer Form if you are interested!)
  • Continuing to seek a Member Manager for the Hub by reaching out to folks and updating call for applicants. Thank you Board Member, Director-At-Large Traci Glass for stepping in as interim!
  • Posted about YALSA’s partnership with Michigan State and Indiana University regarding Artificial Intelligence
  • Met with YALSA President’s Taskforce to develop ideas to continue moving forward on re-building social capital for and with teens
  • Working with AASL/ALSC to determine joint Executive Committee meeting
  • Working with Chairs and Board Members to submit board documents for January meeting (*more information will be shared on this within the next week or so)
  • Called for vote from Board Members for several Board Documents (will be linked here soon) regarding Virtual Option for Award Committees as well as Extension of Evaluating Volunteer Resources Taskforce. Others currently under discussion.

As always, grateful for the passion and work from dedicated volunteers to YALSA! Take a moment to look back on 2021 for all that you’ve accomplished and we’ll continue moving forward-one day at a time! Here’s to 2022!

Any questions or comments, feel free to post below or email: kellyczarnecki1@gmail.com.

Kelly Czarnecki (she/her)
YALSA President
2021-2022

 

“I Remember When the Future was Unevenly Distributed” by cogdogblog is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Issue Theme: Endurance

The past two years have been hard.  Teen librarians and teens have been dealing with a worldwide pandemic.  We have been on lockdown, working from home, separated from family and friends.  We have seen video after video of people murdered on the streets and in schools. There have been protests and trials.  And, in the midst of all of this, we have had to continue to function and provide services and resources for our users, often overlooking our own mental and physical health while caring for those we serve in our libraries.

But, here we are.  We made it to the other side. In this issue we’d like you to share your experiences with the hard parts of the last two years..  What were they? Did you overcome them and how? Did you fail? If you failed, what lessons were learned?  How have your teens coped? What success stories do you have? Are there things you started doing during this time that might stick around?

Let’s share our successes and our failures. Below are just a few of the examples of what we are looking for:

  • Serving teens in a work from home situation
  • Finding and keeping employment in bad times (budget, covid, etc.)
  • Keeping teens encouraged
  • Keeping yourself encouraged
  • Trying new methods/approaches to services and/or resources that were successful
  • Trying new methods/approaches to services and/or resources that failed
  • Taking on more responsibility in your library
  • Giving teens more responsibility in your library
  • Handling book challenges and bans
  • What does self care look like for teen librarians? For teens?
  • What was a struggle? What worked?

Please send your proposals to us by January 3, 2022

https://www.emailmeform.com/builder/form/4ua66O6Sd8Yz1J4E

Article proposals for the Fall 2021 issue of YALS are currently being sought. The theme is Teen Health.

For this issue, we’d like to hear how your teens are coping with health. We seek articles that address a variety of perspectives from youth-supporting staff from inside and outside the library world (public, school, academic, rural, tribal, etc), so please feel free to share this call widely.

This issue is open for articles that provide broad and specific discussions that address questions such as:

  • How has your library leveraged its community partnerships to help connect teens to the health services they need?
  • Is this generation of teens more knowledgeable of teen health concerns?
  • Is the school and/or public library the proper place for information on teen sexual health? Has your library provided information, resources or services to help?
  • How are teens coping with chronic health conditions? How do you lend support to them?
  • In what ways do you provide access to your services and resources to teens who may have difficulty going to libraries because of chronic health issues?
  • Have you created successful programs around teen health?
  • How do you approach collection development with regard to teen-focused health materials?

    We are also seeking articles for our “Future Trending” column, which highlights new, up-and-coming ideas, perspectives, and initiatives that are somewhat out of the box. Examples of focuses include the following themes (or another theme you want to address): technology(ies), Covid-19, universal design, etc. What do you think we should know?

Please note that this is a volunteer writing opportunity with no monetary compensation. YALSA has the right to first refusal.

If you have an article idea for this themed issue, please submit article proposals by July 7, 2021 using this form.

If you know someone who has experience on this topic and would be interested in writing for YALS or have questions, please contact YALS editor, Yolanda Hood at yhood@upei.ca.

Article proposals for the Summer 2021 issue of YALS are currently being sought. The theme is Adulting 101: Building Life Skills for Teen Futures.

This issue is open for articles that provide broad and specific discussions that address questions such as:

• What does it mean to be “ready” for adulthood in 2021? How do adulting skills vary for teens from different backgrounds? (Consider interviewing a teen!)
• How can we best prepare our teens for what comes after high school, whether work or school or some other path?
• What “Adulting 101” programs or resources have you provided for teens?
• Can you offer any best practices or guidelines for those planning life skills workshops?
• How can the library work with community partners to support our teens’ transition to adulthood?

We are also seeking articles for our “Future Trending” column, which highlights new, up-and-coming ideas, perspectives, and initiatives that are somewhat out of the box. Examples of focuses include the following themes (or another theme you want to address):
• Adjusting to COVID
• Equity, diversity, and inclusion in youth services
• Citizenship and immigration
• Civic engagement
• Online engagement and virtual fatigue
• Environmental advocacy

Please note that this is a volunteer writing opportunity with no monetary compensation. YALSA has the right to first refusal.

If you have an article idea for this themed issue, please submit article proposals by April 6, 2021 using this form.

If you know someone who has experience on this topic and would be interested in writing for YALS or have questions, please contact YALS’ guest editor, Tess Wilson at tesskwilson@gmail.com.

Article proposals for the Winter 2021 issue of YALSA’s journal, YALS are currently being sought. The theme for the issue is Youth Voices. Prospective articles include those that consider teen voice, what it is, how teens use it, and how we can provide support through library services, resources, and programming. How do we train ourselves to encourage and support teens who want to engage their communities and the world at large? Learn more and submit by Oct. 28.

YALSA seeks article proposals for its journal, Young Adult Library Services (YALS)’s Fall 2020 issue, themed Trauma Informed Teen Services. This issue will inform readers of trauma-informed teen services, practices, and approaches from various disciplines and experiences that include all types of trauma, including most recently, COVID-19, and beyond.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), by the age of 16, three out of four kids have experienced or been exposed to a traumatic event. Trauma, a distressing or disturbing experience that can be a result of experiencing natural disasters, mental/emotional/physical/abuse, sexual violence, bullying, homelessness among many other events, is especially important to consider as teens cope with past and current traumas in the face of COVID-19. This issue will inform readers of trauma-informed services, practices, and approaches from various disciplines and experiences that include COVID-19 and beyond.

Examples of trauma include the aforementioned natural disasters, all types of abuse and violence, bullying, homelessness, as well as missing out on life milestones such as middle or high school graduation, prom, etc.

Some examples of article topics include:

• Creating a trauma informed workplace through professional development
• How restorative justice supports trauma informed practice
• Library programs or resources that support teens experiencing trauma
• Insight and helpful resources from social workers or experts/organizations in the trauma informed field

Please note that this is a volunteer writing opportunity with no monetary compensation. YALSA has the right to first refusal.

Learn more and submit by June 30.

This year, Teen Read Week and Teen Tech Week will be dissolving to form a month long celebration of teen programming and teen services in libraries across the country! The month long celebration will be held in October of every year.

Teens, want a say in YALSA’s newest month long celebration? Librarians, please encourage your teens to be a part of an exciting initiative. The celebration will include related displays, passive activities, and programming that will fit public libraries, school libraries, and beyond! We will also being asking both teens and librarians for their feedback on the celebration, so be sure to keep an eye out for that.

To submit your celebration name, post on social media with your suggested idea and use #yalsaname or fill out our Google form. The winner will receive prizes and recognition! You are able to submit ideas until 5/31. Once the submission date has passed, there will be a voting period for the top 10 entries. Please share the news! We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

This post was submitted by members of the Teen Tech Week / Teen Read Week Committee.

Welcome to Research Roundup. The purpose of this recurring column is to make the vast amount of research related to youth and families accessible to you.

While preparing the Research Roundup on Social and Emotional Learning for the Winter issue of YALS, I learned that there would be a flurry of publishing in late 2018 and early 2019 in the field of social and emotional learning. This update highlights some of these developments:

  • The Aspen Institute’s National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development released From a Nation at Risk to a Nation of Hope in January 2019. It is the result of two years of study and conversations with experts, practitioners, and parents across the nation. It provides synthesis, case studies and recommendations for future work.  The report makes six recommendations:
    • Set a clear vision that broadens the definition of student success to prioritize the whole child.
    • Transform learning settings so they are safe and supportive for all young people.
    • Change instruction to teach students social, emotional, and cognitive skills; embed these skills in academics and school wide practices.
    • Build adult expertise in child development.
    • Align resources and leverage partners in the community to address the whole child.
    • Forge closer connections between research and practice by shifting the paradigm for how research gets done.
  • CASEL’s Measuring SEL: Using Data To Inspire Practice has published a number of research briefs. I found this brief particularly useful: Equity & Social and Emotional Learning: A Cultural Analysis. Measuring SEL also hosted two design challenges, which give you the chance to learn about SEL assessment tools developed by practitioners.
  • In December 2018, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation published an issue brief Social and Emotional Development Matters: Taking Action Now for Future Generations which gives an overview of key findings and links to reports on specific aspects of SEL that the foundation developed from 2017 until now.
  • The University of Minnesota recently updated its SEL Toolkit. The toolkit uses the Ways of Being SEL Model developed by the University of Minnesota. It focuses on youth in middle school, but provides many activities that can be adjusted for other ages. Many of these activities are applicable to out-of-school time programming.

Submitted by Committee member Bernie Farrell.