The holidays are fast approaching with Thanksgiving tomorrow, Hanukkah starting next week, and Black Friday/Cyber Monday just days away. As you plan your holiday shopping, think about including gifts’  from YALSA for your colleagues. In addition to books, YALSA offers gift memberships, subscriptions to Young Adult Library Services, and t-shirts, mugs, and other products at CafePress.com. Read on to find out how you can include YALSA on your gift list this year.

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Give $10 in '10

Since 2005 the Friends of YALSA (FOY) donors have given more than $25,000 to support YALSA initiatives and services that help the profession and teens. They have sponsored Spectrum Scholars and Emerging Leaders, created advocacy materials for members to use, and sent five YALSA members to ALA’s Library Advocacy Day.

As those YALSA members who attended Annual know, YALSA’s Financial Advancement Committee initiated a major campaign to encourage more people to join Friends of YALSA, called Give $10 in ’10. Financial Advancement Committee members were easily spotted wearing their 2010 sparkly glasses as they passed out information about becoming a FOY in addition to accepting donations. Thanks to the response of attendees, many of whom donated more than $10, more than$1,700 was collected. All money raised by Friends of YALSA in 2010 is being used for YALSA’s advocacy efforts.

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Be sure to take part in FOY’s (Friends of YALSA’s) Give $10 in ’10 campaign that will kick off at Annual in Washington, DC. All FOY funds collected during 2010 are earmarked to support YALSA’s Advocacy efforts.

On the Tuesday of Annual, library advocates from across the United States will meet on U.S. Capitol grounds as part of a rally in support of libraries, followed by meetings with elected officials and their staffs. Five YALSA librarians applied for, and received, funds (provided by FOY) to extend their conference days and attend Library Advocacy Day. In addition, FOY funds are being used to print materials in support of advocacy and to develop an online class in Advocacy Techniques. Read More →

Budget blues getting you down? Wondering how to get your voice heard? Want to stand up for libraries? Get ready for National Library Advocacy Day, this year’s re-imagined National Library Legislative Day on June 29th, 2010, in conjunction with ALA’s Annual Convention in Washington, DC.

Thanks to the Friends of YALSA, funding has been provided for five YALSA members to receive up to $1,000 in travel stipends to attend the event. The deadline for applications is next Friday, April 30th, so fill out your application (PDF) or (Word) today.

Applications and information on eligibility and selection criteria are available here.’  You can also check out Stephanie Kuenn’s post for the complete list of instructions.

See you on Capitol Hill!

YALSA will offer travel stipends of up to $1,000 each to five YALSA members to participate in ALA’s Library Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C. on June 29, 2010, held in conjunction with ALA Annual Conference.

Applications are available as a PDF or Word document. They can also be downloaded at YALSA’s Awards and Grants page and must be sent to yalsa@ala.org by April 30. Applications must be sent electronically.

Funding for this stipend is provided through the Friends of YALSA. Friends of YALSA was created to ensure excellence in the association’s traditional programs and services to library workers serving teens and to support growth in new directions as our profession meets the exciting challenges of the twenty-first century. Learn more about the Friends of YALSA.

After the jump, learn more about how to apply, eligibility, and criteria for selection.

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It took me a whole week to sort through my thoughts and notes for the YALSA President’s Program! Here they are at last.

The YALSA President’s Program kicked off Monday afternoon June 26 with Pam Spencer Holly and Beth Yoke delivering highlights from the past year (did you know YALSA is the fastest growing division in ALA? 😉 It’s really amazing that not only has membership increased by 10%, but 25% of YALSA members are student members. Could a student interest group be in the works?

The President’s 2005-2006 Report was well-organized and reflects accomplishments that align with the YALSA Strategic Plan.

I think Pam was so eager to pass over her presidential gavel to incoming president Judy Nelson that she forgot to mention an item on the agenda – Friends of YALSA. The website shows that YALSA only has 18 friends! I slipped a form to my boss, and I think I can get my mom to contribute too – who can YOU ask?

2007 sounds like it will be as busy as 2006! Tons of events are in the works as YALSA turns 50, Teen Tech Week lauches, and much, much more.

Judy Nelson announced a return to our roots with the theme of her presidency, “Still Reading After All These Years,” a focus on the wonderful rich and diverse world of our beloved YA literature. Very fitting, and smart, in light of the recent misconceptions of YA novels as fluff and nonsense.

Appropriately, the program that followed the membership meeting was all about the Renaissance of YA Literature, and a sequel to a program 10 years ago on the same topic: What’s so Adult about Young Adult? The afternoon was a celebration of crossover titles including the likes of Weetzie Bat (the original crossover novel) Perks of Being a Wallflower, and more. I missed the names of some of the speakers, so thanks in advance for any corrections you guys who attended can contribute.

Author and YA lit critic Michael Cart (Booklist’s “Carte Blanche” column, My Father’s Scar, and editor of Rush Hour, who convened the original program on this topic, gave a brief history of crossover novels, lamenting that titles so appropriate for teens are published as adult for (mostly) economic reasons, and commenting on the lack of adult recognition of the value of YA lit, stated of those who think that YA lit is “the stuff of Sweet Valley High, more the fools, they.”

What makes a crossover title? They share several traits:

  • first novels
  • young authors
  • coming of age theme (teen protagonist)
  • incorporate the mysterious, puzzling, and enigmatic

Next, a publisher spoke (missed her name!), sharing the stat that of the top 50 bestselling juvenile titles, 9 are (currently YA titles), and explaining a little about why editors publish young adult books under adult imprints.

Author Aidan Chambers (This is All, Postcards from No Man’s Land) offered the British perspective with humor and aplomb, quoting Shakespeare, poking fun at himself and explaining his position on the “life follows art” theory.

Author Greg Galloway (As Simple as Snow) followed, and discussed literature as types of glass – the transparent “windex” kind popularized by the likes of Dan Brown, and the more complex stained glass kind in which literary greats such as Flannery O’Connor and Raymond Chandler delight in use of language.

Sheila (Scofield? sorry Sheila!) provided the librarian in the field point of view, speaking about the gamut of authors and formats and genres teens ask for. She recommended promoting adult titles to young adults and young adult titles to adults by incorporating them into displays and booklists recommending YA titles to librarians serving adults, and asking the adult services librarians to recommend crossovers.” Promoting teen lit IS advocacy for teens, she said; her top suggestions are

Pretties/Uglies/Specials by Scott Westerfield
I is Someone Else by Patrick Cooper
titles by Marcus Zusak
Feed by M.T. Anderson

She concluded by reminding us that authors tell stories; they don’t write for a selected audience, and quoted Ranganathan: “Every reader has his or her book; Every book has its reader.” The concept was followed up in the Q&A period when one of the panelists reminded us that the readership of a book is one (the original Long Tail?).

Three excellent booklists distributed at this program are online at http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/annual.htm

~posted by Beth Gallaway